Category Archives: politics

PHILANDO CASTILE’s Daughter in Tears “DON’T GET SHOOTED, MOM!”

Moments after Philando Castile was shot dead by Officer Jeronimo Yanez … his fiancee and her daughter were in the back of a police car, and the just-released video of them is absolutely heartbreaking.

You’ll recall, Diamond Reynolds broadcast the aftermath of the July 2016 police shooting on Facebook Live. Her then 4-year-old daughter was sitting in the back seat of the car during the shooting, and afterward police put them both in custody.

In this video authorities just released … Reynolds is still screaming in anger in the back of the police cruiser — and the little girl cries, “Mom, please don’t scream ’cause I don’t want you to get shooted!” She sobbed and continued begging her mother to calm down.

The video was just released because Yanez’s trial ended last week. He was found not guilty of manslaughter.

SOURCE: TMZ

NBA Warriors Unanimously Vote to Skip White House Visit

Per reports, less than 24 hours after becoming the 2017 NBA Finals champions, the Warriors have decided to decline the White House visit.

NBA Warriors Unanimously Vote to Skip White House Visit

With President Trump in office, there have been many conversations about if athletes should take political stands by choosing to refuse traditional championship White House visits. Many of the Patriot players skipped out on their visit with Trump after winning the Super Bowl.

While no one from the Warriors organization or the White House has released a statement about the report, reporter Shaun King and CNBC analyst Josh Brown have both shared the information.

It should be noted that the Warriors did attend the White House ceremony when Obama held office in 2015 after their Finals win over the Cleveland Cavaliers.

SOURCE: VLADTV

20 Years Later, Biggie Smalls’ Mom Has a ‘Very Good Idea’ Who Killed Him

On September 7, 1996, West Coast hip-hop legend Tupac Shakur was gunned down in Las Vegas. Six months later, Brooklyn heavyweight Biggie Smalls—The Notorious B.I.G.—was fatally targeted in a L.A. drive-by shooting. Biggie’s death was also the final nail in the coffin of the West Coast-East Coast, Death Row Records-Bad Boy Records feud that came to define hip-hop’s 1990s glory days. On the anniversary of Biggie’s murder 20 years later, it’s difficult to remember a time when coastal allegiances amounted to more than a preference for Shake Shack or In-N-Out.

While Biggie and Tupac may have been enemies by the end—with Tupac rapping about sleeping with Biggie’s wife, and ‘Pac turning against Biggie in the wake of the 1994 Quad Studios shooting — death is the great equalizer: Now, the once-beefing rappers are equally likely to be found immortalized on the dorm room wall of a college freshman, or momentarily resurrected as a headlining hologram. But incredibly advanced lasers aren’t the only forces bringing these hip-hop legends back to life. Two decades later, the lives and deaths of Tupac and Biggie are getting the USA network treatment. The upcoming series Unsolved, which dives deep into the two cold case murder investigations, stars Wavy Jonez and Marcc Rose as Biggie and Tupac, respectively. For Rose, it will be his second time playing 2Pac, reprising his role from 2015’s Straight Outta Compton.

And while watching Jonez and Rose channeling the rappers on set is unsettling, life is even stranger than fiction. In a new Daily Mail interview Voletta Wallace, the 64-year-old mother of Biggie Smalls, insists that a “conspiracy” is standing in the way of justice being served. Wallace confidently points fingers at the LAPD, claiming, “I have a very good idea who murdered Christopher and I genuinely believe that the LAPD knows exactly who did too.” She adds, “They’ve done their investigation, but they just refuse to move forward. I don’t know why they haven’t arrested who was involved. It seems to me that it’s one giant conspiracy, and someone is definitely being protected somewhere down the line.” For Biggie’s mother, “There’s no closure for me until that murderer is behind bars and sentenced.”

Of course, Wallace isn’t the first to weigh in on Biggie’s killing, and she certainly won’t be the last. The still-unsolved murders of Biggie and Tupac have launched more conspiracy theories than Alex Jones could ever dream of. Among the more outlandish claims are theories that the FBI shot both of the rappers in an effort to curb hip hop-related violence, or that Biggie and Tupac are actually alive and kicking it in a small resort town in New Zealand. Hey, if it’s good enough for Peter Thiel, it’s good enough for Biggie and ‘Pac.

While we don’t have a name or a face to link to Wallace’s claims, there are a good number of details for would-be conspiracists to comb through, courtesy of a cache of FBI files on the case. In 2011 The Daily Beast went through the documents to get a more vivid picture of Notorious B.I.G’s murder. Twenty years ago, Biggie was leaving a Soul Train Awards afterparty in a three-car motorcade; Biggie was in the second car, and his friend and label founder Sean Combs was in the first. At around 12:45 a.m., “An African-American male dressed in a blue suit and bow tie” fired six shots at the vehicles, with four of them hitting Biggie Smalls in the chest. The rapper was pronounced dead at 1:15 a.m.

Death Row Records executive Suge Knight was a main suspect, in keeping with the theory that Biggie’s death was a direct response to Tupac’s murder. Knight denied any and all involvement in B.I.G’s death. The LAPD, which was accused of corruption in the case, made the decision in tandem with the FBI to close the investigation into Biggie’s murder, abandoning the 18-month case they had been trying to build against Knight. Four years later, the case was reopened after new information allegedly surfaced. Biggie’s mother brought a $400 million wrongful death suit against the LAPD in 2006, which was eventually dismissed.

The FBI files are full of juicy details, such as information about LAPD Officer David A. Mack, a suspect in the case who had a Tupac shrine in his garage, along with guns and ammo. Other interesting tidbits include one informant’s accusations that Notorious B.I.G. had secret ties to New York City’s Genovese crime family, and the revelation that the rapper was carrying marijuana, a pen, an asthma inhaler, and three magnum condoms on his person at the time of his death. But according to a new Daily Mail source, Biggie wasn’t even the intended victim. The source, who was allegedly with Biggie on the night of his death, “is convinced the bullets were meant for P. Diddy.” There’s a certain logic to that, seeing as many fans believe that the artist formerly known as Puff Daddy played a pivotal role in Tupac’s death. According to this theory Sean Combs, one of hip-hop’s biggest living moguls, was just one lucky Suburban away from meeting his maker.

SOURCE: DB

 

GOP Calls on Investigation of Trump’s Ties to Russia

Following the news of national security adviser Michael Flynn resigning on Monday (February 13), top GOP lawmakers met on Tuesday to call for an investigation into Trump’s ties with Russia. They also want Flynn to testify.

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Sen. Roy Blunt (Rep. MO) said, “I think everybody needs that investigation to happen,” adding, “And the Senate Intelligence Committee, again that I serve on, has been given the principal responsibility to look into this, and I think we should look into it exhaustively so that at the end of this process, nobody wonders whether there was a stone left unturned, and shouldn’t reach conclusions before you have the information that you need to have to make those conclusions.”

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Senator Blunt also spoke on the importance of the trustworthiness of the national security advisor, after reports surfaced of Flynn speaking about sanctions against Russia before Trump was sworn in. Blunt explained, “In this case, absolute trustworthiness is the most important thing, even better than, even more important than knowledge, you’ve got to trust what the national security adviser says and apparently that wasn’t gonna be the case here.”

SOURCE: VLADTV

Devin McCourty & Martellus Bennett To Skip White House Visit

New England Patriots star Devin McCourty became the second Super Bowl champion to declare that he will not be joining his team for a trip to meet President Donald Trump at the White House, on Monday, February 6.

[NFL] Devin McCourty To Boycott White House Visit

Leading up to Sunday’s big game in Houston it had been anticipated that Martellus Bennett would boycott the tradition, with he and his Seattle Seahawks star brother, Michael, being two of the more politically vocal voices in the NFL. Bennett had hinted that he wouldn’t be attending during Super Bowl opening night festivities last week, and reconfirmed his position following the Patriots’ historic comeback win, stating, “It is what it is, people know how I feel about it.”

[NFL] Devin McCourty To Boycott White House Visit

In a text message sent to Time magazine, McCourty followed suit with his tight end teammate, writing, “I’m not going to the White House … Basic reason for me is I don’t feel accepted in the White House. With the president having so many strong opinions and prejudices I believe certain people might feel accepted there while others won’t.”

[NFL] Devin McCourty & Martellus Bennett To Skip White House Visit

It remains to be seen how Bennett and McCourty’s refusal to head to the nation’s capital might impact their standing on the team, as Patriots owner Robert Kraft, head coach Bill Belichick, and QB Tom Brady are all avid supporters of the President. Should any kind of repercussions be levied against them, the team may face a backlash from Black players around the league, considering the team brought itself to meet President Obama without its team captain in 2015, when Brady omitted himself from the White House visit.

SOURCE: VLADTV

Alicia Keys Attend Women’s March

Protests against Donald Trump’s presidency have become a global movement. Washington D.C., Chicago, Los Angeles, New York City, London, Toronto, and Paris, are just some of the cities hosting marches Saturday (Jan. 21).

Alicia Keys Attend Women’s March

Though the final numbers have yet to be tallied, it’s already clear that the Women’s March trumped the inauguration figures. Alicia Keys, Janelle Monae, America Ferrera, and Uzo Aduba, were among those at the Washington D.C. march.

Alicia Keys Attend Women’s March
“We are mothers, we are caregivers, we are artists, we are activists,” Keys told the crowd. “We are entrepreneurs, doctors, leaders of industry and technology. Our potential is unlimited. We rise!” Keys also performed “Girl on Fire,” while Monae shared the stage with the Mothers of the Movement, and performed “Hell You Talmbout” off her 2013 album, The Electric Lady.

Alicia Keys Attend Women’s March

Ferrerra also shared a powerful address with the crowd. “It’s been a heart-wrenching time to be a woman and an immigrant in this country,” said the 32-year-old actress. “Our dignity, our character, our rights have all been under attack and a platform of hate and division assumed power yesterday. But the president is not America. His cabinet is not America. Congress is not America, we are America and we are here to stay.” – See more at:

SOURCE: WWF

Inside the Women’s March & History in the Making

Donald Trump hammered home in his inaugural address outside the Capitol building Friday the promise he had sewn onto so many red ballcaps: that he would Make America Great Again. In the same spot the following day, protesters with far less nostalgia for America’s past – women who lived through the Civil Rights movement, who came of age in an era when abortion was criminalized, who have vivid memories of a time when gay men and women were regularly victimized – have gathered to say, We are not going back. 

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An estimated 500,000 marchers – more than double the crowd that showed up to watch Trump’s swearing-in – are squeezed onto the National Mall with their families and their hand-drawn signs and their pink knit caps, waiting for their turn to talk at the Women’s March on Washington.

They self-describe as “nasty,” but for the most part the marchers are good: they don’t push, they carry their possessions in translucent bags, as requested, and their posters don’t have poles or sticks or stakes. Some are frustrated to see the evangelical Christians who are parked in the middle of the Mall hoisting signs that read “Attention Rebellious Jezebels” and “Abortion Is Murder” with strictly verboten metal poles.

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It isn’t fair, but add it to the fucking list: Hillary Clinton earned three million more votes than Donald Trump and still lost the presidency. Women earn 80 cents on the dollar compared to men – women of color even less. They have only 19 percent representation in Congress.

As they’ve proven by turning out in record numbers all over the U.S. and the world Saturday, women are tired of double standards. So they surround the anti-abortion protesters and chant, “My body, my choice!” and “Love trumps hate!” loud enough to drown out the bullhorn.

A teenage boy leans out from the Newseum’s second-floor balcony, waving and kissing his star-spangled Make America Great Again hat and hollering, “Jesus loves you! Donald Trump loves you!” as the march sweeps down Pennsylvania Avenue. The marchers channel Michelle Obama, drowning him out with chants of, “When they go low, we go high!”

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For the millions of men and women pouring into the streets around the world Saturday, the march is a show of force, proof that for however many people are happy about Donald Trump’s inauguration – and that number is far smaller than he or his press secretary would have us believe – many more are unhappy. Across the country, and in countries around the globe, people are showing up to drown Trump out.

Just past the Newseum, four women – ages 57, 66, 77 and 79 – are sitting on a bench, watching as a line of police vans cuts through the protesters. One of the women, Roberta Safer, explains why they drove together from Maryland for the march. “I demonstrated in 1957 for Civil Rights,” she says. “It’s still the same problems, and Donald Trump’s cabinet picks are going to reverse many of the things that we’ve had. … It just upsets me to see us go backwards.”

Her friend Rosanna Mason has similar concerns. “My wife, before she died, was a teacher. I’m getting texts constantly from her students: ‘What about me, what about me? Am I going to be deported? Are they going to send me to [conversion] therapy?’ A lot of people are scared.” She says she tells them the only thing she can: that she remembers how she coped as a lesbian before gay rights were mainstream. “I remember back in the Seventies, I remember the Eighties, the violence. I tell them to hold on to your friends. … because when we all do it together, we’ll be stronger.”

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The Bikers for Trump have set up a counter-protest in support of the new president at a park on Pennsylvania Avenue. There aren’t more than 20 Trump supporters there, but they have a stage equipped with speakers blasting Lee Greenwood, Toby Keith and Kid Rock at an unreasonable volume. At one point, the group’s head, Chris Cox, gets onstage and tells the marchers, “On November 8th, America voted, and it voted for Donald Trump.”

“Three million votes! Three million votes!” they chant back.

Off to one side, 31-year-old Courtney Miller is holding a sign that reads, “Sorry. Were my civil rights getting the way of your privilege?” She asks a man in a Confederate hat why he still wears it even though the South lost. He retorts by asking her why she has black pride – her people lost too, he says. For ten minutes, he tries (and fails) to defend an indefensible point, while she maintains her composure, trying, maybe in vain, to reason with him.

“You never get anything accomplished by fighting, by yelling and screaming. We’re not going to get our points across. We might leave here today and agree to disagree, but maybe I said something that will make him think,” Miller says after the interaction. “I’m standing here because my grandparents had to do this. Now I have to do this. I’m hoping my kids don’t have to do this. We’re marching for the same things, and I’m getting tired.”

SOURCE: RS