Tag Archives: Colin Kaepernick

Eric Reid Signs with Panthers Following NFL Grievance

Pro Bowl free-agent safety Eric Reid signed with the Carolina Panthers on Thursday (September 27) after he was not re-signed with the 49ers after filing a grievance with the NFL. Reid also made waves as the first player to join Colin Kaepernick in kneeling during the national anthem to protest racial inequality and police brutality.

Both Reid and Kaepernick filed grievances with the NFL, alleging that owners and the league prevented their employment because of the protests. Kaepernick, who is still unsigned, reacted to the news of Reid joining the Panthers, tweeting, “Congrats 2 my brother @e_reid35, all pro safety who should have been signed the 1st day of free agency, who has signed a football contract. He was the 1ST person 2 kneel alongside me. Eric is a social justice warrior, continues to support his family. and communities in need.”

Eric Reid Signs with Panthers Following NFL Grievance

Reid’s deal is a one-year contract worth up to $2 million with play-time and Pro Bowl incentives

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Nike has donated three times as much money to Republicans as Democrats this year

There seems to be a bit of a disconnect between Nike’s branding and the sporting good giant’s political leanings.

While Nike has caught heat from right-leaning supporters for its decision to feature Colin Kaepernick in the company’s latest ad campaign, a new report from the Center for Responsive Politics — a non-profit, non-partisan research group focusing on money in politics — shows that Nike employees and its political action committee have donated more than three times as much money to republican candidates as democratic challengers for the 2018 election season.

In all, Nike has given $424,000 to the GOP compared to $122,000 to Democrats. The findings follow a recent trend showing Nike has donated more to Republicans than Democrats in every election cycle since 2010 with the exception of 2016.

According to the report, nearly half of all donated funds from Nike employees has come from co-founder Phil Knight and his family.

The Knight family has also given $1.5 million to republican Knute Buehler in his race for Oregon governor against incumbent democrat Kate Brown. The contribution is the largest individual donation to an Oregon candidate since the state started electronically tracking such dealings in 2006.

Nike World Headquarters are located Beaverton, Oregon.

Among Buehler’s platforms are lower corporate taxes and repealing Oregon’s sanctuary state laws for undocumented immigrants.

Compared to its rival companies, Nike has donated far more to politicians than it’s competitors. Both Nike and New Balance have each given more than $1.2 million to Republican candidates since 2010, however Nike has also donated more than $900,000 to Democrats over that same time span. By comparison, Adidas and Under Armour have donated less than $600,000 combined to both parties since 2010.

Whatever blowback Nike received following the unveiling on the ad campaign with Kaepernick, it hasn’t done nearly anything to slow down the company’s growth. Nike’s stock recently hit an all-time high and has gone up nearly five percent since the Kaepernick ads launched in early September. That translates to an additional $6 billion in market value, per CBS News.

On the year, Nike is up 36 percent and is performing better than any other company listed on Dow’s index of 30 blue-chip stocks.

Kaepernick is currently signed on a long-term deal with Nike that pays him millions each year and is on par with contracts for other star NFL players.

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Nike’s Colin Kaepernick TV ad is inspirational, not controversial

The question Friday morning wasn’t whether President Trump would tweet about the debut of Colin Kaepernick’s Nike commercial but whether it would be the first thing he would tweet about after waking up.

And there it was, first thing on the presidential docket at 6:56 a.m.

“What was Nike thinking?” Trump tweeted rather briefly and directly.

But if you actually watched the commercial that aired on NBC during the third quarter of season-opening games between the Falcons and Eagles, it’s pretty obvious what Nike is thinking – and it’s not whether to take a knee during the national anthem.

All you need to know about Nike’s ultimate goal with the Kaepernick campaign is contained in the ad’s first minute. It begins with a skateboarder falling off a rail, a child with no legs on a wrestling mat, an African-American boy who couldn’t be 10 years old running down a dirt road, a young shadowboxing woman wearing hijab, a surfer, a Pop Warner football game and a blond girl playing high school football against boys.

This isn’t about consumers Nike might lose in their anger over Kaepernick. It’s about cultivating an entire generation of consumers who are up for grabs at a moment where the lines between culture, politics and activism are blurry – a notion that might make older people uncomfortable but is now the coming-of-age reality for anyone under 18.

Ironically, if you take Kaepernick out of the ad, there is nothing controversial about the images and words contained inside of it. “Don’t ask if your dreams are crazy; ask if they’re crazy enough” seems like it could be a tag line to practically any Nike ad campaign, a direct link to the “Just Do it” slogan the company is celebrating with a 30th anniversary push.

Every one of those images connects to the overall theme of being different, of overcoming some type of obstacle or stereotype, which fits in well with why Kaepernick is here in the first place rather than playing quarterback in the NFL.

But it also seems designed to appeal to teenagers, without making it necessary to align with Kaepernick’s political and social justice views.

Yes, it’s Kaepernick’s voice and his image at the end, walking down a city street wearing a black mock turtleneck underneath a tan coat. But there is nothing in the ad that connects him to football or the NFL, even though his own backstory – being adopted by white parents, getting one college scholarship offer from Nevada and ultimately quarterbacking a team to the Super Bowl – contains some of the same inspirational threads as the people he’s narrating over.

Moreover, the commercial’s only allusion to the protest he sparked is subtle. As the camera brings Kaepernick into view from behind – you recognize him by his Afro – he’s standing and looking at a waving American flag being projected onto a building.

Then, as Kaepernick walks out of the frame, the images of the young people from earlier in the ad appear on those buildings and the words are flashed on the screen: “It’s only crazy until you do it. Just do it.”

Casting Kaepernick in this light is interesting because he’s the only person in the ad who isn’t shown playing a sport or wearing some type of Nike gear. That seems intentional, as if to acknowledge that he’s moved beyond the sports context and into the zeitgeist of these political and cultural times.

And when you think about what Nike’s actually trying to accomplish here, it makes perfect sense.

Though Nike has been the country’s preeminent sneaker and sports apparel company for a generation, Adidas has steadily been making headway, particularly with younger people. In the second quarter of 2018, Adidas posted a $485 million profit, shattering Wall Street expectations. That followed nine consecutive quarters in which the company’s sales increased by at least 20%.

Fueled by its alliance with pop culture stars such as Kanye West and Pharrell Williams, Adidas has made up significant ground and surpassed Jordan Brand (a Nike subsidiary) last year as No. 2 in the sneaker game.

Nike didn’t really have a comparable face, and many of its preeminent athletes they’ve been associated with outside the NBA (such as Tiger Woods, Roger Federer, Serena Williams) are at the back end of their careers and don’t necessarily identify with teenagers. But that’s what shoe companies have to do: Figure out not just who their customers are now, but who their customers are going to be in five years, 10 years and beyond.

That’s who this is aimed at. We’re on the cusp of welcoming a generation of kids into adulthood who grew up with politics being injected into practically every area of their lives. Whether that’s a good thing will be for others to determine, but it’s a moment that’s happening and Nike is looking for a way to capitalize on it.

Kaepernick probably won’t sell a lot of shoes to my contemporaries. But would the ad that played Thursday night resonate with high school kids who are growing up in a confusing, polarized, politically active era? Nike is counting on it.

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NFL Denied from Getting Kaepernick Collusion Case Dismissed

News broke Thursday concerning the ongoing collusion case against the NFL, filed by former 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick. Arbitrator Stephen Burbank made the announcement that the case would move onto trial, effectively denying the league’s attempt at dismissing the case. Burbank’s statement read:

“On August 28, 2018, the System Arbitrator denied the NFL’s request that he dismiss Colin Kaepernick’s complaint alleging that his inability to secure a player contract since becoming a free agent in March 2017 has been due to an agreement among team owners and the NFL that violates Article 17, Section 1 of the collective bargaining agreement between the NFL and the NFLPA.”

At the moment, Kaepernick’s former teammate Eric Reid is still waiting on a decision regarding his grievance filed against the NFL alleging collusion on the same grounds as Kap.

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Kaepernick Files Collusion Grievance Against Owners of the NFL

Colin Kaepernick is taking the NFL to court. It was reported on Sunday, October 15, that the star quarterback-turned-activist has filed a grievance that accuses the league’s team owners of collusion under its collective bargaining agreement with the NFL Players Association. After news broke about the move it was confirmed that he has foregone representation under the Players Association and hired high powered attorney Mark Geragos (who has defended the likes of Michael Jackson and Chris Brown) to argue his case.

Each of the NFL’s 32 teams has been sent a copy of the court document, as has the NFLPA. The complaint charges that owners and executives around the NFL “have colluded to deprive Mr. Kaepernick of employment rights in retaliation for Mr. Kaepernick’s leadership and advocacy for equality and social justice and his bringing awareness to peculiar institutions still undermining racial equality in the United States.” Geragos has called for an arbitration hearing on behalf of his client.

Kaepernick has been out of a job since opting out of his contract with the San Francisco 49ers in March. He’d go on to shop his on-field abilities to a couple of teams but stopped receiving calls to work out for teams in the market for a quarterback before long. As the offseason dragged out with various questionable signings at the quarterback position, fans began to question why Kaepernick was being passed over and suspicions that he was being blackballed began to take root. While a number of players and analysts have openly professed their belief that his activism is viewed as a “distraction” and thus played a role in him being denied a shot, team representatives have vehemently denied that he is being blackballed on their account.

SOURCE: VLADTV

Russell Simmons Offers Brandon Marshall Endorsement Deal

NFL linebacker Brandon Marshall has found a supporter who can offer him more than his sympathies, following reports that a second Marshall sponsor has pulled its endorsement in response to his recent protest of the National Anthem.

Russell Simmons Offers Brandon Marshall Endorsement Deal

Music mogul Russell Simmons took to Instagram upon learning the news on Tuesday [September 13], and extended Marshall an opportunity to recoup some of his lost bucks while he continues to stand for what he believes in.

Russell Simmons Offers Brandon Marshall Endorsement Deal

“Which other company is supporting Brandon? It says two endorsements,” Simmons asked followers, before jumping the gun on a possible partnership. “RUSHCARD is in. We will find Brandon and make him an offer and make him a deal.”

Russell Simmons Offers Brandon Marshall Endorsement Deal

Marshall is one of the players who has followed Colin Kaepernick‘s lead in bringing a call for the nation to address racial injustice, to the NFL in 2016. In fact, while Kaepernick sparked the movement back in August, Marshall was the first to abstain from observing the anthem during the regular season, rallying various players around the league to continue joining after he took a knee during the star-spangled banner before the year’s inaugural game against the Carolina Panthers on Thursday.

Russell Simmons Offers Brandon Marshall Endorsement Deal

Within 24 hours of staging his dissent, Marshall’s partnership with Air Academy Federal Credit Union was severed. On Monday came news of another voided endorsement, when CenturyLink announced it’s parting from Marshall. Interestingly enough, CenturyLink is the sponsor of CenturyLink Field, home of the Seattle Seahawks. The Seahawks themselves have had an overt presence among the league’s protesters, demonstrating with interlocked arms during pre-game ceremonies on Sunday. There has been no word as to whether CenturyLink plans on punishing the Seattle team, but the company’s maneuver could none the less spell out inhibition among players who are planning to protest, as it’s reached over the sport includes a partnership with DirecTV.

SOURCE: VLADTV