Tag Archives: Serena Williams

Artist Blasted for Racist Depiction of Serena Williams at U.S. Open

Australia’s Herald Sun newspaper came under fire for artist Mark Knight’s cartoon depiction of Serena Williams’ incident at the U.S. Open, which many see as racist.

The photo went viral online, with celebrities like Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling blasting the photo on Twitter, writing, “Well done on reducing one of the greatest sportswomen alive to racist and sexist tropes and turning a second great sportswoman into a faceless prop.”

Jemele Hill also added that the photo is “About as subtle as Fran Drescher’s voice.”

Herald editor Damon Johnston backed Knight’s cartoon in a statement, which read, “A champion tennis player had a mega tantrum on the world stage, and Mark’s cartoon depicted that. It had nothing to do with gender or race.”

Knight also reacted himself, stating, “I drew this cartoon Sunday night after seeing the US Open final, and seeing the world’s best tennis player have a tantrum and thought that was interesting,” he said. It’s been picked up by social media in the US and my phone has just melted down. The world has just gone crazy.”

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Nike’s Colin Kaepernick TV ad is inspirational, not controversial

The question Friday morning wasn’t whether President Trump would tweet about the debut of Colin Kaepernick’s Nike commercial but whether it would be the first thing he would tweet about after waking up.

And there it was, first thing on the presidential docket at 6:56 a.m.

“What was Nike thinking?” Trump tweeted rather briefly and directly.

But if you actually watched the commercial that aired on NBC during the third quarter of season-opening games between the Falcons and Eagles, it’s pretty obvious what Nike is thinking – and it’s not whether to take a knee during the national anthem.

All you need to know about Nike’s ultimate goal with the Kaepernick campaign is contained in the ad’s first minute. It begins with a skateboarder falling off a rail, a child with no legs on a wrestling mat, an African-American boy who couldn’t be 10 years old running down a dirt road, a young shadowboxing woman wearing hijab, a surfer, a Pop Warner football game and a blond girl playing high school football against boys.

This isn’t about consumers Nike might lose in their anger over Kaepernick. It’s about cultivating an entire generation of consumers who are up for grabs at a moment where the lines between culture, politics and activism are blurry – a notion that might make older people uncomfortable but is now the coming-of-age reality for anyone under 18.

Ironically, if you take Kaepernick out of the ad, there is nothing controversial about the images and words contained inside of it. “Don’t ask if your dreams are crazy; ask if they’re crazy enough” seems like it could be a tag line to practically any Nike ad campaign, a direct link to the “Just Do it” slogan the company is celebrating with a 30th anniversary push.

Every one of those images connects to the overall theme of being different, of overcoming some type of obstacle or stereotype, which fits in well with why Kaepernick is here in the first place rather than playing quarterback in the NFL.

But it also seems designed to appeal to teenagers, without making it necessary to align with Kaepernick’s political and social justice views.

Yes, it’s Kaepernick’s voice and his image at the end, walking down a city street wearing a black mock turtleneck underneath a tan coat. But there is nothing in the ad that connects him to football or the NFL, even though his own backstory – being adopted by white parents, getting one college scholarship offer from Nevada and ultimately quarterbacking a team to the Super Bowl – contains some of the same inspirational threads as the people he’s narrating over.

Moreover, the commercial’s only allusion to the protest he sparked is subtle. As the camera brings Kaepernick into view from behind – you recognize him by his Afro – he’s standing and looking at a waving American flag being projected onto a building.

Then, as Kaepernick walks out of the frame, the images of the young people from earlier in the ad appear on those buildings and the words are flashed on the screen: “It’s only crazy until you do it. Just do it.”

Casting Kaepernick in this light is interesting because he’s the only person in the ad who isn’t shown playing a sport or wearing some type of Nike gear. That seems intentional, as if to acknowledge that he’s moved beyond the sports context and into the zeitgeist of these political and cultural times.

And when you think about what Nike’s actually trying to accomplish here, it makes perfect sense.

Though Nike has been the country’s preeminent sneaker and sports apparel company for a generation, Adidas has steadily been making headway, particularly with younger people. In the second quarter of 2018, Adidas posted a $485 million profit, shattering Wall Street expectations. That followed nine consecutive quarters in which the company’s sales increased by at least 20%.

Fueled by its alliance with pop culture stars such as Kanye West and Pharrell Williams, Adidas has made up significant ground and surpassed Jordan Brand (a Nike subsidiary) last year as No. 2 in the sneaker game.

Nike didn’t really have a comparable face, and many of its preeminent athletes they’ve been associated with outside the NBA (such as Tiger Woods, Roger Federer, Serena Williams) are at the back end of their careers and don’t necessarily identify with teenagers. But that’s what shoe companies have to do: Figure out not just who their customers are now, but who their customers are going to be in five years, 10 years and beyond.

That’s who this is aimed at. We’re on the cusp of welcoming a generation of kids into adulthood who grew up with politics being injected into practically every area of their lives. Whether that’s a good thing will be for others to determine, but it’s a moment that’s happening and Nike is looking for a way to capitalize on it.

Kaepernick probably won’t sell a lot of shoes to my contemporaries. But would the ad that played Thursday night resonate with high school kids who are growing up in a confusing, polarized, politically active era? Nike is counting on it.

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Serena Williams Posts First Pictures of Daughter Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jr.

Nearly two weeks after giving birth, tennis champion and now proud mom, Serena Williams, posted pictures of her newly born daughter on Instagram.

Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jr., named after her father and Williams’ fiance, was born on Sept. 1st, 2017 weighing 6lbs. and 14oz. In a video on Serena’s website, she says “we had a lot of complications but look what we got. We got a baby girl.” The newly born champion came into this world healthy and undefeated.

SOURCE: VLADTV

Serena Williams Gives Birth To Baby Girl

A baby just in time for Labor Day weekend.

Serena Williams and fiancé Alexis Ohanian welcomed a baby girl at St. Mary’s Medical Center in West Palm Beach, Florida, on Friday, according to multiple reports.

WPBF-25 news producer Chris Shepherd was first to report that Williams gave birth to her daughter, weighing 6 pounds, 13 ounces, writing that mom and baby are “doing well.”

Beyoncé later confirmed the news, congratulating her friend on the newest addition to the family.

Williams reportedly checked in two days prior, clearing out an entire floor of the hospital for security purposes before going into delivery. This is the first child for both the tennis champion and the Reddit co-founder.

Williams first announced she was 20 weeks pregnant in April with a Snapchat photo of herself in a swimsuit. She later revealed, however, that the photo was shared by accident due to pressing the wrong button. Given the timeline, her followers quickly deduced that Williams was expecting when she won the Australian Open in January like a total legend

Before giving birth, the 35-year-old said she had a “strong suspicion” that she was having a girl, while Ohanian thought a baby boy was on the way.

“Two weeks after we found out, I played the Australian Open,” Williams explained to Vogue. “I told Alexis it has to be a girl because there I was playing in 100-degree weather, and that baby never gave me any trouble. Ride or die. Women are tough that way.”

Williams and Ohanian have been linked together as early as 2015, but kept their relationship private. The two first met by chance in Rome near the hotel buffet and Williams gave him her number. After a magical rendezvous in Paris weeks later, they began a relationship.

SOURCE: HP

Beyoncé Shows Off Twin Bump At Baby Shower

A very pregnant Beyoncé stripped down to a bikini top and long skirt during her Beverly Hills baby shower Saturday — with no qualms about showing off her twin-sized baby bump.

The 35-year-old mega-celebrity, who has yet to reveal the gender or due date of the babies-to-be, has decorated her massive belly with a large henna tattoo, as these photos from her star-studded shower show.

Guests included La La Anthony and tennis goddess Serena Williams, who is also pregnant. Beyoncé’s ex-Destiny’s Child bandmates, Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams, also attended.

Proud mom Tina Knowles Lawson led guests in hollering “Happy Carter push party!” — a shout-out to Beyoncé’s married name: Mrs. Shawn “Jay-Z” Carter. The couple’s daughter, Blue Ivy, was born in 2012. Beyoncé caused a sensation when she announced in February — to her 92 million Instagram followers — that she is pregnant with twins.

SOURCE: WWF