Category Archives: international

French Montana Officially Becomes An American Citizen

Congratulations to French Montana for officially becoming a United States citizen! Born in Morocco, the rapper immigrated to the United States with his family when he was 13 years old.

According to the source, French, born Karim Kharbouch, mailed his citizenship application in February 2017. He took the Naturalization Oath of Allegiance on Wednesday, and he is now a legit citizen of the United States, TMZ reports.

French Montana made his mixtape debut in 2007 and he is the founder of Coke Boys Records. Pprior to that, Cocaine City Records. In 2012, he signed a joint-venture recording deal with Bad Boy Records. Last year, he dropped Jungle Rules with the Swae Lee-featuring hit “Unforgettable.”

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FCC Officially Repeals Obama-Era Net Neutrality Rules

The Federal Communications Commission’s repeal of net neutrality rules officially went into effect Monday (June 11).

The net neutrality rules enacted by the President Barack Obama administration in 2015, prohibited internet providers from charging more for certain content such as those that require more bandwidth or from giving preferential treatment to certain websites. The rules basically required internet service providers to offer equal access to all web content.

Despite the outcry from the public imploring the F.C.C to leave net neutrality rules in place, the commission went ahead and voted to repeal the rules in December.

With net neutrality officially repealed, consumers and advocates are worried that broadband providers could begin selling the internet in bundles like cable television packages have begun doing; selling sports, MTV/VH1/BET etc bundles. For instance, access to Facebook, Twitter, and other social media sites could require paying for a premium social media package. Memes with made up monetary figures circled around social media prior to the F.C.C’s vote and was a major part of the uproar from the public. Another concern is that now that paid prioritization is no longer prohibited, the transmission of data could be slowed for those who do not pay a premium while a fast lane could be occupied by big internet and media companies, as well as affluent households. Small business owners are also worried about an unfair playing field with their websites loading more slowly compared to big companies with a bigger budget. The internet has made it much easier for people to go into business for themselves with a fairly small budget but this could change things, as well as for freelancers and those who work remotely; they could face a higher cost of doing their jobs from home.

Citizens, public interests groups, state attorneys, and Democratic lawmakers pushed to overturn the decision, arguing that a repeal would allow service providers to censor content online or charge additional fees. Several states have taken steps to overrule the F.C.C’s repeal on a local level. In March, Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington signed a law that effectively replaced the federal rules. The Governors of Montana and New York used executive orders to force net neutrality. Also, as of late May, 29 state legislatures introduced bills meant to ensure net neutrality, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Some of these measures, however, have failed, some are still pending, and some states have not taken any action at all.

The F.C.C, however, has made arguments for repealing the rules. They voted for the repeal because the rules restrained broadband providers like Verizon and Comcast from experimenting with new business models and investing in new technology. The chairman, Ajit Pai, has long argued that the rules were just put into effect in 2015 and service providers had not engaged in any of the feared practices before net neutrality was put into place.

Several internet providers have made public pledges that they will not block sites and slow down the transmission of data once the rules were repealed. They argued that Title II gave the F.C.C. too much power over their business and the regulations made it hard to expand their networks.

Democratic lawmakers are still fighting to reinstate net neutrality. Barbara Underwood, New York’s attorney general, noted that lawsuits opposing the repeal were still pending.

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How Princess Charlotte, 2, just made royal history

Move over, #RoyalBaby. Princess Charlotte, not even 3, has just made history.

Although her mother, the Duchess of Cambridge, gave birth to a son Monday morning, Charlotte’s order in the line of succession to the British throne won’t change based on her gender.

This makes Charlotte the first princess who won’t be overtaken in the line by a younger brother.

It’s all thanks to the Succession to the Crown Act of 2013, which changed tradition to state that the gender of a royal born after October 28, 2011 does not give that person, or their descendants, precedence over anyone else in determining the next monarch.

Before this legislation was passed, older sisters were passed by their baby brothers in the order of succession. This would have dropped Princess Charlotte, 2, behind both her siblings: Prince George, 4, and the as-yet-unnamed baby.

The Succession to the Crown Act was announced in 2013 but didn’t take effect until 2015, making Monday’s newborn the first member of the immediate royal family to be affected by its changes.

Prince Charles is the current heir to the British throne, which has been occupied by his mother, Queen Elizabeth II, since 1952. Prince William is second, followed by Prince George, Princess Charlotte, and the new baby boy.

What about Prince Harry, you ask? He has now been demoted to sixth in line.

Kate Middleton gave birth to the newest member of the royal family about 11 a.m. local time at St. Mary’s Hospital in Paddington, west London. The boy is Queen Elizabeth II’s sixth great-grandchild. He weighs 8 lbs 7oz (3.8 kilograms), and both mother and baby are “doing well,” according to the Palace.

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KAREN MCDOUGAL SETTLES NATIONAL ENQUIRER SUIT

Ex-Playmate Karen McDougal is clear to spill the beans about her alleged affair with Donald Trump … and, perhaps most importantly to her, make a ton o’ money off it.

McDougal had sued the National Enquirer’s parent company, American Media, over a non-disclosure agreement she signed with them in 2016. She got $150k and some promotional perks, and the Enquirer got her exclusive story about the 2006 affair with Trump. She sued to get out of the deal.

Well, they reached a settlement … according to the New York Times, and is now allowed to talk all she wants about her Trump relationship. You’ll recall, McDougal sat down with Anderson Cooper last month for a CNN special.

So, why does the settlement matter? It’s pretty clear based on the terms, which include American Media getting $75k of any future profits Karen makes off selling the Trump story.

Start the countdown to Karen’s tell-all book hitting stores — but ya gotta wonder what’s left for her to reveal. The NYT says she also gets to keep her $150k fee.

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Feds Set to Prosecute Juelz Santana on Drug and Gun Charges

Harlem native and Dipset representative Juelz Santana has found himself in an unfortunate situation. It has been reported that the rapper is now facing federal charges stemming from ditching his luggage containing a gun and drugs at Newark Liberty International Airport earlier this month.

Juelz initially faced state charges but those charges were dropped as a sign of deference to the feds who are set to prosecute the rapper. He pleaded not guilty to gun and drug charges levied against him but remains in jail until pending hearings.

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March for Our Lives: Hundreds of thousands expected

Hundreds of thousands of people are expected to take to the streets Saturday for March for Our Lives events across the U.S. — the biggest set to happen in Washington, D.C.

Busload after busload has filled the nation’s capital with students from across the country, including some from as far away as California and Minnesota.

The march was announced by students days after the Valentine’s Day shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., and since then, more than 800 sister marches have been planned.

Events are scheduled in every U.S. state and on every continent, all with the same mission: ending gun violence and taking up gun-control legislation. Organizers expect 500,000 to descend on the nation’s capital, including many from Parkland.

Mei-Ling Ho-Shing arrived in D.C. on Thursday. She was one of the many who were inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during the attack, which left 17 dead. The junior said she plans to link arms with her classmates and march in hopes of changing laws so what happened at her school will never happen again.

“Douglas is in the house. We’re here and coming to make a change,” she said, adding “this isn’t a trending topic. This is people’s lives. We’re not going to stop after this. When we go home we’re still going to be fighting for this.”

The shooting instantly reignited the gun-control debate. But the students in Parkland — who spoke with a loud voice and amassed an enormous following in the hours and days after the shooting — seemed to disrupt the typical cycle after an attack and demanded an end to gun violence.

Within a month of the rampage, several companies cut ties with the National Rifle Association and stopped offering discounts, students from 3,000 schools held a nationwide walkout, and Florida’s governor signed a comprehensive bill that included tightening gun laws.

Jaclyn Corin, one of the core group of Parkland students leading the #NeverAgain movement and organizing the marches, said it’s been unbelievable to see the support around the nation and how thousands of students have rallied for the cause.

She said the outpouring is a “constant reminder that even though this shooting was a horrible tragedy, we’ll make these changes and see some light come out of the bad.”

Corin, 17, said preparations for the march have been stressful, but she and the others are excited. She said this march is just the beginning of what they hope to accomplish.

“We want to continue what we’re doing, especially leading up to November,” she said. “We want every young person to register to vote and head to the polls, no matter who they’re voting for or what party they’ve voting for.”

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Trump Campaign Manager Paul Manafort Facing 305 Years in Prison

Former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort chose to avoid a guilty plea that would have forced him to concede to special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into the Russian government’s possible interference on the President’s behalf in the 2016 elections. Thus, Manafort will go to trial to fight a bevy of charges that could get him a 300+ year prison sentence for illegal business dealings he had with pro-Russia foreign nationals in Ukraine.

Two separate trials await Manafort, with one scheduled to begin in Virginia in July and one set for September in Washington, D.C. If convicted on multiple bank fraud, conspiracy, and tax violations he’s facing he could be slammed with a maximum of 305 years by a Virginia court alone.

Then conspiracy and foreign lobbying violations could potentially give him an additional 20 years if found guilty in D.C. The defense will be faced with the task of disproving that Manafort hid earnings he made off of Ukrainian politicians (while working as a U.S. official) in shell companies and offshore accounts. He is accused of then using the money to fund a lavish lifestyle and purchase property.

Due to the nature of Manafort’s crimes and fear that he may have built an elaborate enough network of international connects to flee and go missing, he is being restricted to house arrest with a pair of GPS monitors and must request permission to leave his home for anything other than religious services, meetings with his attorneys, or medical emergencies. His bail has been set at an unsecured $10 million.

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