Tag Archives: national news

Nashville Officer Charged with Criminal Homicide in Shooting of Black Man

Nashville officer Andrew Delke was charged with criminal homicide for fatally shooting Daniel Hambrick, 25, in the back as he ran from the officer. Delke’s attorney says he plans to plead not guilty in the case.

Nashville Officer Charged with Criminal Homicide in Shooting of Black Man

In late July, Delke was in the area looking for stolen vehicles and became suspicious of an Impala who he says “conceded the right of way by not pulling out in front of him.” After running the plates on the car and determining it wasn’t stolen, Delke continued to follow the car to develop a reason to stop it. When Delke parked his car in a nearby apartment complex, he says that’s when he saw Hambrick running away.

Video footage shows Delke chasing Hambrick and in a matter of seconds, the man falls to the ground after being shot. Delke claims that Hambrick was holding a gun, which he told him to drop, and when he didn’t, the officer shot four times, hitting Hambrick in the head, back, and left torso. Authorities recovered a gun from the scene.

Delke turned himself in on Thursday (September 27) and he was released on $25,000 bail.

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UN General Assembly Laughs at Trump’s “Extraordinary Progress” Speech

Donald Trump garnered some unexpected laughs after telling the UN General Assembly on Tuesday (September 25) about the “extraordinary progress” of his administration in a speech.

He started off by saying, “One year ago I stood before you for the first time in this grand hall. I addressed the threats facing our world, and I presented a vision to achieve a brighter future for all of humanity. Today I stand before the United Nations General Assembly to share the extraordinary progress we’ve made.”

He added, “In less than two years, my administration has accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of our country. America’s… So true.”

After hearing laughter in the crowd, Trump responded by saying, “I didn’t expect that reaction but that’s okay.”

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Bill Cosby Arrives in Court for Sentencing Hearing Today

Bill Cosby arrived at the courthouse in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, around 8:15 a.m. on Monday (September 24) for his sentencing hearing for drugging and sexually assaulting former Temple University employee Andrea Constand.

Cosby was convicted on three aggravated indecent sexual assault charges in April, with each charge carrying a sentence of up to 10 years. Cosby has said he vows to appeal.

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T.I. Curating Pop-up Museum in Atlanta

Trap music will be getting some props thanks to plans by rapper T.I. to curate a museum in Atlanta, Vibe is reporting.

T.I. Curating Pop-up Museum in Atlanta

The pop-up museum is launching 15 years from the release of the artist’s Trap Muzik, which he said he created to draw attention to all the frustrations a Black man in America might have to juggle – from co-parenting to drug addiction, and from society’s negative view to struggling relationships. Atlantic Records produced Trap Muzik in 2003.

T.I. is launching the museum in partnership with hip-hop journalist Maurice Garland, creative artist DL Warfield and others, Vibe reports. Future, 21 Savage, 2 Chainz, Gucci Mane, Rick Ross, and Young Jeezy are some of the artists who will be featured because they helped elevate the public presence of the trap, according to Vibe.

The pop-up museum has a website and Instagram account set up. Both instruct people to “stay tuned.”

T.I. Curating Pop-up Museum in Atlanta

When he released Trap Muzik, T.I. said he wanted to create something that would be a classic.

“I knew I had to make timeless music,” Noisey quoted him as saying. “It was about showing that even if you were participating in felonious activities, there were still other things you needed to deal with: you’re not just drug dealing but also dealing with a relationship with your parents, your girlfriend, having a child too young and being looked down on by society as one thing when you’re actually more than that definition.”

He told Noisey, “You might have a homeboy who just died, but he wasn’t even in the streets like that. Trap Muzik was kind of crystallizing this Black experience into a piece of music.”

The pop-up museum will be located in West Atlanta and will open to the public on Sept. 30. Trap music evolved out of Southern hip-hop and is considered a sub-genre.

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Omarosa Leaks New Tape of Trump Talking About Hillary and “Russia Story”

Omarosa Manigault-Newman released another tape of Donald Trump on Monday, September 10, and this time around, the president is speaking about Hillary Clinton and the “real Russia story.”

In the tape, Trump can be heard accusing Hillary Clinton of colluding with the Russians ahead of the 2016 election. He states, “I think Hillary is getting killed now with Russia. The real Russia story is Hillary and collusion,” adding, “Somebody told me it was $9 million they spent on the phony report. Yeah, someone just said she’s far worse for the country than we thought, she didn’t know her own campaign was spending 9, did you see?”

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Nike’s Colin Kaepernick TV ad is inspirational, not controversial

The question Friday morning wasn’t whether President Trump would tweet about the debut of Colin Kaepernick’s Nike commercial but whether it would be the first thing he would tweet about after waking up.

And there it was, first thing on the presidential docket at 6:56 a.m.

“What was Nike thinking?” Trump tweeted rather briefly and directly.

But if you actually watched the commercial that aired on NBC during the third quarter of season-opening games between the Falcons and Eagles, it’s pretty obvious what Nike is thinking – and it’s not whether to take a knee during the national anthem.

All you need to know about Nike’s ultimate goal with the Kaepernick campaign is contained in the ad’s first minute. It begins with a skateboarder falling off a rail, a child with no legs on a wrestling mat, an African-American boy who couldn’t be 10 years old running down a dirt road, a young shadowboxing woman wearing hijab, a surfer, a Pop Warner football game and a blond girl playing high school football against boys.

This isn’t about consumers Nike might lose in their anger over Kaepernick. It’s about cultivating an entire generation of consumers who are up for grabs at a moment where the lines between culture, politics and activism are blurry – a notion that might make older people uncomfortable but is now the coming-of-age reality for anyone under 18.

Ironically, if you take Kaepernick out of the ad, there is nothing controversial about the images and words contained inside of it. “Don’t ask if your dreams are crazy; ask if they’re crazy enough” seems like it could be a tag line to practically any Nike ad campaign, a direct link to the “Just Do it” slogan the company is celebrating with a 30th anniversary push.

Every one of those images connects to the overall theme of being different, of overcoming some type of obstacle or stereotype, which fits in well with why Kaepernick is here in the first place rather than playing quarterback in the NFL.

But it also seems designed to appeal to teenagers, without making it necessary to align with Kaepernick’s political and social justice views.

Yes, it’s Kaepernick’s voice and his image at the end, walking down a city street wearing a black mock turtleneck underneath a tan coat. But there is nothing in the ad that connects him to football or the NFL, even though his own backstory – being adopted by white parents, getting one college scholarship offer from Nevada and ultimately quarterbacking a team to the Super Bowl – contains some of the same inspirational threads as the people he’s narrating over.

Moreover, the commercial’s only allusion to the protest he sparked is subtle. As the camera brings Kaepernick into view from behind – you recognize him by his Afro – he’s standing and looking at a waving American flag being projected onto a building.

Then, as Kaepernick walks out of the frame, the images of the young people from earlier in the ad appear on those buildings and the words are flashed on the screen: “It’s only crazy until you do it. Just do it.”

Casting Kaepernick in this light is interesting because he’s the only person in the ad who isn’t shown playing a sport or wearing some type of Nike gear. That seems intentional, as if to acknowledge that he’s moved beyond the sports context and into the zeitgeist of these political and cultural times.

And when you think about what Nike’s actually trying to accomplish here, it makes perfect sense.

Though Nike has been the country’s preeminent sneaker and sports apparel company for a generation, Adidas has steadily been making headway, particularly with younger people. In the second quarter of 2018, Adidas posted a $485 million profit, shattering Wall Street expectations. That followed nine consecutive quarters in which the company’s sales increased by at least 20%.

Fueled by its alliance with pop culture stars such as Kanye West and Pharrell Williams, Adidas has made up significant ground and surpassed Jordan Brand (a Nike subsidiary) last year as No. 2 in the sneaker game.

Nike didn’t really have a comparable face, and many of its preeminent athletes they’ve been associated with outside the NBA (such as Tiger Woods, Roger Federer, Serena Williams) are at the back end of their careers and don’t necessarily identify with teenagers. But that’s what shoe companies have to do: Figure out not just who their customers are now, but who their customers are going to be in five years, 10 years and beyond.

That’s who this is aimed at. We’re on the cusp of welcoming a generation of kids into adulthood who grew up with politics being injected into practically every area of their lives. Whether that’s a good thing will be for others to determine, but it’s a moment that’s happening and Nike is looking for a way to capitalize on it.

Kaepernick probably won’t sell a lot of shoes to my contemporaries. But would the ad that played Thursday night resonate with high school kids who are growing up in a confusing, polarized, politically active era? Nike is counting on it.

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Mac Miller, Pittsburgh Rapper And Producer, Dead At 26

Mac Miller, the Pittsburgh-born rapper who developed a ravenous following over the course of five successful albums, died Friday of an apparent overdose in his Los Angeles home, multiple outlets have reported. He was 26 years old.

He was found unresponsive in his home in the Studio City neighborhood of Los Angeles late Friday morning and was pronounced dead at the scene, the Los Angeles County coroner’s office confirmed to NPR, though the office said an autopsy was pending and said an official cause of death had not yet been determined.

Born Malcolm James McCormick in Pittsburgh, Mac Miller had a string of hit albums reach the top ranks on the Billboard 200. His 2011 debut, Blue Slide Park, reached No. 1 on that chart, followed by 2013’s Watching Movies with the Sound Turned Off (No. 3); 2015’s GO:OD AM (No. 4); 2016’s The Divine Feminine (No. 2); and, released just last month, Swimming, which reached No. 3 on the Billboard 200. He was also a skilled producer under the alias Larry Fisherman.

Mac Miller openly struggled with substance abuse, which he documented throughout his mixtapes and albums. (On the song “Loud,” he said “Yeah, people lie, numbers won’t … Keep me high, drugs is close … Roll one up, pour a cup … Watch the world go up in smoke.”) Last month, the Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office reportedly charged the rapper with a DUI in the wake of a May car accident, which came after a highly public breakup between he and singer Ariana Grande.

At a Tiny Desk concert taped last month for NPR Music, he performed three tracks from Swimming for the first time in front of an audience. “I may trip, but I never fall,” he rapped in the song “Small Worlds.” “God knows, I came close — don’t try this at home.”

The day before Mac Miller’s death, Vulture published a profile in which he addressed his relationship to fans and friends alike: “The people that have the best chance of knowing me, that would like to, would just be by listening to my music.”

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