Category Archives: black lives matter

University of Florida Under Fire for Pushing Black Graduates Offstage

The University of Florida came under fire over the weekend, after recordings taken during the school’s year-end commencement ceremony went viral amongst members of the public who grew outraged over the way they saw some of the Black graduates being treated.

UF Under Fire for Pushing Black Graduates Offstage

Many of the roughly 10,000 fresh-faced alumni who crossed the Exactech Arena stage at the Stephen C. O’Connell Center on Sunday (May 6), did so in style, with some stopping to pose for awkward selfies, others doing dance moves, skips, and flips, and one gentleman even kneeling down to propose to his girlfriend. There were also several instances in which the ceremony’s marshall got rough while moving to rush exuberant grads off – and in each of those cases, the students happened to be Black.

Myesha Senior had plans to celebrate before her Jamaican flag-waving family by doing a Usain Bolt dash pose, but the moment was ruined when she was suddenly manhandled by the marshall. “I tried to do it really fast. I saw the guy coming toward me … and when he pushed me, I almost fell, and I caught myself. But he pushed me so far that I passed the lady’s hand that I was supposed to shake,” she reportedly told The Washington Post of the moment.

Similar actions were taken against Nafeesah Attah, who was nearly knocked over while going to flash a Delta Sigma Theta hand gesture, and to Oliver Telusma, who wound up having to wrap his arms around the marshall to keep from tipping over due to the way he was rushing him along.

University President Kent Fuchs would later take to Twitter to apologize. He has also contacted each of the alum seen in the videos to express his regrets personally. Fuchs confirms that the marshall is being investigated.

SOURCE: VLADTV

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Honoring Martin Luther King, Jr. 50 years after assassination

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – The King family will join thousands in Memphis this week to mark the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Dr. King’s daughter Bernice King arrived in Memphis Monday afternoon. She was aboard a Delta charter flight. So was FOX 5’s Deidra Dukes, who was the only reporter on board and got to interviewed Rev. Bernice King during the flight.

King talked a lot about what this week will mean not only for her but other members of her family as she returns Memphis. The first time she journeyed to Memphis was in her 30s because the idea of making this trip in the past has been so painful for her. So, this week will likely stir many emotions.

“It’s emotional for me but I’m trying not to let it overwhelm me so I can function,” Dr. Bernice King said.

A wave of emotion came over Dr. Bernice King as she made her way through TSA at Hartsfield Jackson for the trip to Memphis.

“I think I said, you know, I didn’t get an opportunity to go fifty years ago, then I broke down crying. I didn’t know it was coming,” Dr. Bernice King said.

Fifty years ago, a then five-year-old Bernice was left behind as her mother and three older siblings who traveled to Memphis just days after Dr. Martin Luther King Jr was assassinated.

“On April 8, 1968, my mom came to Memphis to lead the march my father would have led which was the day before the funeral and she brought the three older children and I got left in Atlanta,” Dr. Bernice King said.

Monday afternoon, she boarded a Delta charter flight joined by dozens of religious and civil rights leaders, for the pilgrimage to Memphis. King said the number of pastors joining her on this journey really hold special significance.

“Tell them that 50 years ago because my father spoke out against the war in Vietnam he became even more controversial and a lot of churches began to close their doors even black churches. It was hard for him to have mass meetings in churches and very few were welcoming. So, for me to come back here with a group of pastors is unbelievable for me,” Bernice King told FOX 5’s Deidra Dukes.

King toured the Lorraine Motel where her father was shot and killed that fateful day in April of 1968 as he stood on the hotel balcony.

“It’s interesting to be able to have these experiences, connections not knowing my father, but kind of sensing the presence of his spirit,” Bernice King said. “I do feel a connection to his spirit and what he was trying to do.”

Bernice King will be joined by her brother Martin for this week’s commemorative events in Memphis. On Tuesday, they will speak at the Mason Temple, where their father delivered his last speech.

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Stephon Clark Private Autopsy Results Revealed: 7 Gunshot Wounds in the Back

The findings of an independent autopsy commissioned by the family of Stephon Clark reveal that he was struck by a total of eight bullets, with up to seven of them hitting him in the back by the Sacramento police officers who fired on him earlier this month.

When officers responding to reports of break-ins in the Meadowview neighborhood came upon Clark, he was standing in the yard of his grandmother’s house. Moments prior, the 22-year-old was spotted running and hopping fences to the spot where he was located. Without much warning, the cops fired more than 20 shots and waited more than two minutes before beginning to engage an unresponsive Clark from afar. Dr. Omalu estimates that the unarmed suspect died between 3 and 10 minutes after he was struck.

Clark was shot once under the armpit, once in the leg, twice in the neck, and four times in his lower back. The examiner found that he suffered a shattered vertebrae and a collapsed lung.

“These findings from the independent autopsy contradict the police narrative that we’ve been told,” family attorney Benjamin Crump said of the results. “This independent autopsy affirms that Stephon was not a threat to police and was slain in another senseless police killing under increasingly questionable circumstances.”

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Jay-Z’s Trayvon Martin Documentary Will Debut At Tribeca Film Festival

Jay-Z has always been a man of the people. The Brooklyn bred rap legend has made his socio-economic and political views tremendously clear over the last decade. Whether that be by voicing his opinions over records like “Murder To Excellence,” or publicly supporting President Barack Obama during his two terms in office, Jay has been pushing African-American culture like it’s his job. Now, the 48-year-old rapper is bringing his docu-series about Trayvon Martin to the prestigious Tribeca Film Festival.

According to Entertainment Weekly, Jay will be screening Rest In Power: The Trayvon Martin Story at the festival, and afterward, Martin’s parents Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin will address live. The documentary claims to offer a “definitive look at one of the most talked-about, controversial events of the last decade.”

Jay-Z’s documentary is based on the book Rest in Power: The Enduring Life of Trayvon Martin, which was written by his parents after their child was infamously murdered by Geroge Zimmerman. Martin’s death increased the national spotlight on the unnecessary deaths of young black children in America.

Jay-Z also famously produced Time: The Kalief Browder Story, a short docuseries about Kalief Browder. Young Browder was jailed for three years, and spent two of them in solitary confinement, for allegedly stealing a backpack. He took his own life after a tumultuous case surrounding the false charges led him to lose his mental stability.

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Disney Donates $1M for STEM Center in Oakland in Honor of ‘Black Panther’ Film

With the success of Black Panther, Disney, the parent company of Marvel Studios, is set to donate $1 million to expand the Boys & Girls Club STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) programs in Oakland, CA. As the film began to garner more and more attention, the prospects of a box office hit were imminent. Many questioned whether or not some of the money the film was projected to make would go toward the Black community and it seems that Disney is attempting to do just that.

Bob Iger, chairman, and CEO of The Walt Disney Company stated:

“Marvel Studios’ Black Panther is a masterpiece of movie making and has become an instant cultural phenomenon, sparking discussion, inspiring people young and old, and breaking down age-old industry myths. […] It is thrilling to see how inspired young audiences were by the spectacular technology in the film, so it’s fitting that we show our appreciation by helping advance STEM programs for youth, especially in underserved areas of the country, to give them the knowledge and tools to build the future they want.”

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Jury Grants Family of Police Shooting Victim Korryn Gaines $37M

After three weeks of testimony and a few hours of subsequent deliberation, an all-female jury overseeing the wrongful death civil trial of slain police shooting victim Korryn Gaines – ruled in favor of awarding her family $37 million, on Friday, February 16.

Gains was gunned down when after a six-hour standoff, officers locked out of her Randallstown apartment with an arrest warrant finally busted in to find her armed with a shotgun. The 2016 incident drew a passionate response from the public over several unsettling tactics used by Baltimore County police. For one, authorities had Gains’ wi-fi cut off as she was live streaming the confrontation, and secondly, many took exception to the force used in disregard of the fact that her five-year-old son Kodi was present to witness the situation unravel.

Kodi will now receive $32 million of the total, as it was determined that County Cpl. Royce Ruby’s use of force, when he fired off the first shot, was not objectively reasonable. The ruling contradicts the findings of a county prosecution that previously established that the shooting was legally justified. In addition to the lions share of the settlement that Kodi will inherit, Gains’ daughter will get $4.5 million, and her father, mother, and general estate will get $300K respectively.

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Jordan Greenway is U.S. hockey team’s first African-American Olympian

GANGNEUNG, South Korea — Jordan Greenway doesn’t know when this historic moment will hit him.

He predicts it won’t happen while he’s helping Team USA try to win a gold medal in Pyeongchang. But sometime down the road it will have more of an impact.

Greenway, a junior winger for Boston University, is the first African-American to compete for the U.S. men’s hockey team in the Olympics.

“I think it’s great, it’s unbelievable,” Greenway said following a practice at Gangneung Ice Arena. “I don’t think it’s hit me how I think it will later on in my life to be honest with you. I grew up around a predominantly white population and a lot of white people playing (hockey), so I’ve always looked at it as just another kid. I think it’s an honor. I’m very excited about it. I hope I’m the first of many.”

Greenway, 20, has played hockey all his life. He put on his first pair of skates when he was 3. It’s what kids are accustomed to growing up in Canton, N.Y., which is 20 miles from the Canadian border. Plus his brother J.D., who is a sophomore defenseman at Wisconsin, and all of his cousins played. He was just next in the family line. Greenway tried out other sports — football, lacrosse, baseball — but didn’t develop the same passion.

“I was OK at them,” he said, laughing. “I kind of mixed it up, but I don’t know. I always had the most fun playing hockey. I enjoyed waking up really early in the morning and playing hockey. I didn’t have the same enjoyment going to (play other sports). I didn’t want to do that for football or other sports. Just thought this was the right fit for me.”

Greenway was drafted by the Minnesota Wild in 2015, but chose to stay in school. Because the NHL prohibited its players from Olympic competition, he’s able to live out his dream as an amateur.

Physically, he’s a big body on the ice at 6-5, 230 flat-footed. Greenway estimates he’s 6-8 or 6-9 on skates, but such an imposing figure could fudge his numbers and say he’s 7-feet and no one would blink.

His height certainly provides an advantage when getting to the net, protecting the puck and creating space, but it’s not always better to be bigger, he said.

“You get some of these smaller guys who are quick and they put you on edge,” he said, smiling. “But it definitely has a lot of benefits.”

Greenway tallied 25 points in 28 games for Boston U. this season and was second with eight points on the U.S. team that won gold in the 2017 junior world championships. He also played for the 2017 world championship team that finished fifth.

By making history, Greenway hopes to use these Olympics to inspire other African-American kids to play hockey.

“That’s definitely the goal,” he said. “Trying to get more, not just African American, but more cultures playing. I don’t think it’s any secret that more white people play than black people. So hopefully I can try to be another role model to try to put it in these kids’ minds to hopefully try and do something different and hopefully we’ll get more black people and different cultures playing the game.”

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