Tag Archives: shooting

Nashville Officer Charged with Criminal Homicide in Shooting of Black Man

Nashville officer Andrew Delke was charged with criminal homicide for fatally shooting Daniel Hambrick, 25, in the back as he ran from the officer. Delke’s attorney says he plans to plead not guilty in the case.

Nashville Officer Charged with Criminal Homicide in Shooting of Black Man

In late July, Delke was in the area looking for stolen vehicles and became suspicious of an Impala who he says “conceded the right of way by not pulling out in front of him.” After running the plates on the car and determining it wasn’t stolen, Delke continued to follow the car to develop a reason to stop it. When Delke parked his car in a nearby apartment complex, he says that’s when he saw Hambrick running away.

Video footage shows Delke chasing Hambrick and in a matter of seconds, the man falls to the ground after being shot. Delke claims that Hambrick was holding a gun, which he told him to drop, and when he didn’t, the officer shot four times, hitting Hambrick in the head, back, and left torso. Authorities recovered a gun from the scene.

Delke turned himself in on Thursday (September 27) and he was released on $25,000 bail.

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Officer convicted in killing of 15-year-old Jordan Edwards — a rare outcome in police shootings

A former police officer in Texas has been found guilty of murder in the high-profile shooting death of 15-year-old Jordan Edwards — a rare victory for civil rights activists seeking justice for the dozens of unarmed African American men and boys who have been killed by police officers in recent years.

As Judge Brandon Birmingham read the verdict Tuesday against Roy Oliver, who worked in the Dallas suburb of Balch Springs, sobs came from the gallery of the packed courtroom. The last time an on-duty police officer in Dallas County was convicted of murder was in 1973. Oliver could be sentenced to life in prison.

“I’m just so thankful,” Jordan’s father, Odell Edwards, told reporters. “Thankful, thankful.”

Daryl Washington, an attorney representing the family, said the verdict meant more than justice for Jordan.

“It’s about Tamir Rice. It’s about Walter Scott. It’s about Alton Sterling,” he said, naming victims of police shootings in recent years. “It’s about every, every African American, unarmed African American, who has been killed and who has not gotten justice.”

Republican Gov. Greg Abbott tweeted a link to a news story about the conviction, saying that Jordan’s “life should never have been lost.”

On the night of April 29, 2017, Oliver fired an MC5 rifle into a Chevrolet Impala carrying Jordan and two of his brothers as it pulled away from a high school house party. Jordan, who was struck in the head, died later at a hospital.

Police initially said the vehicle had backed up toward Oliver “in an aggressive manner,” but body camera video showed the car was moving away from him and his partner. Days after the shooting, Oliver, who had served in the department for six years, was fired.

Jordan’s stepbrother, Vidal Allen, was driving the car the night of the shooting.

“I was very scared,” Allen testified. “I just wanted to get home and get everyone safe.”

Oliver, 38, has said he feared for his life and his partner’s safety.

“I had to make a decision. This car is about to hit my partner,” Oliver testified in the trial. “I had no other option.”

After a weeklong trial, it took the jury one day to reach a verdict.

Jordan’s death echoes other police shootings involving black boys and men. But no convictions were handed down in most of those cases.

In November 2014, Cleveland police got a 911 call about someone brandishing a pistol near a park — the weapon, the caller said, was “probably fake.” But in an incident captured on camera, a police cruiser pulled into the park and Officer Timothy Loehmann jumped out and opened fire. Within seconds, 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who had a toy gun, was dead.

Even before Tamir’s death, the U.S. Department of Justice had been investigating the Cleveland Police Department. A month after his shooting, it released a report saying Cleveland police displayed a pattern of using unnecessary force.

A year later, a grand jury decided not to indict Loehmann in Tamir’s death, saying he had reason to fear for his life.

In September 2016, in Columbus, Ohio, police shot and killed Tyre King, 13, who was carrying a BB gun while running from police. A grand jury declined to file criminal charges against the officer who killed him.

And in May 2017, an Oklahoma jury acquitted an officer who shot and killed Terence Crutcher, 40, as he stood with his hands above his head along a rural highway.

Those cases and others illustrate the difficulty of convicting police officers. The law in most places gives them the benefit of the doubt.

Prosecutors usually must show that an officer knowingly and intentionally killed without justification or provocation. A fear of harm has been successfully used as the justification for many shootings, even when the victim turned out to be unarmed.

The most recent case that ended in a conviction came last year when Michael Slager, a former officer in North Charleston, S.C., was first tried on murder charges in the April 2015 shooting of Walter Scott, an unarmed black man who was stopped for a driving with a broken taillight. But after those proceedings ended in a mistrial, Slager pleaded guilty to a civil rights violation and was sentenced to 20 years in prison.

The last Dallas County police officer convicted for murder while on duty was Darrell Cain, who shot and killed 12-year-old Santos Rodriguez after forcing him to endure a version of Russian roulette while handcuffed inside a patrol car.

There was no immediate reaction to Thursday’s verdict from local or national police groups.

John Fullinwider, a longtime Dallas activist and co-founder of Mothers Against Police Brutality, said Oliver’s conviction came as a surprise.

“I expected to see an angel fly over City Hall before I saw this murder conviction,” he said. “This is a victory, but we really need independent federal prosecutors in all fatal police shootings.”

Lee Merritt, a civil rights attorney who represents the Edwards family, said the conviction was justice for the country.

“We’ve seen time and time again, no charges, let alone convictions, in these high-profile shootings,” he said. “It is my hope that this is a turning point in the fight against police brutality against blacks.”

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George Zimmerman Charged After Allegedly Stalking Private Investigator

George Zimmerman, who gained attention after he was acquitted for shooting Trayvon Martin, was charged after stalking a private investigator. In December 2017, Zimmerman allegedly threatened Dennis Warren, a Florida private investigator. Warren reached out to Zimmerman to see if he was interested in working on a documentary about Trayvon Martin.

Zimmerman was served on May 3, and his next court appearance is on May 30 for arraignment.

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Will a Bulletproof Backpack Save Your Life During a School Shooting?

The school shooting in Florida has renewed the question of what to do during an attack. Experts advise making a barricade between yourself and the shooter, leading Inside Edition to seek out what’s really going to stop a bullet. Jimmy Grammenos of Gun for Hire Academy in New Jersey used a .22 pistol and the larger 9 mm handgun to show what gives you a better chance of protection. A sign of the new times is that there are bulletproof backpacks for sale.

Parkland Students Are Not Happy About Their Clear Backpacks

The students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are not impressed by their school’s new safety measure. Six weeks after a gunman killed 17 people at the Parkland, Florida, school, students were given clear backpacks they are required to wear in order to prevent anyone from bringing weapons onto campus.

Robert Runcie, the superintendent of Broward County Public Schools, announced the new policy last month, after the shooter’s brother was caught trespassing on campus, and two students were charged with carrying knives onto school grounds. Runcie also said students would be issued ID badges they must wear at all time while at school, and that the district is considering installing metal detectors.

Students were immediately critical of the decision, with one senior, Kyra Parrow, tweeting, “s/o to America for making my school seem like jail now because legislators don’t have common sense gun reform on their agendas.” Reactions weren’t any warmer when the backpacks were handed out on Monday after students returned from spring break.

Some students used the clear plastic backpacks to broadcast their opinions on the new requirement.

Since the shooting, Stoneman Douglas students have been at the forefront of a renewed push for stricter gun-control legislation. The new bags were issued just over a week after millions of people around the world joined Parkland students for the March for Our Lives protest for gun control.

“We’re going to make sure the best people get in our elections to run not as politicians, but as Americans. Because this,” Parkland survivor David Hogg said at the march in Washington D.C., pointing at the U.S. Capitol, “This is not cutting it.”

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Stephon Clark Private Autopsy Results Revealed: 7 Gunshot Wounds in the Back

The findings of an independent autopsy commissioned by the family of Stephon Clark reveal that he was struck by a total of eight bullets, with up to seven of them hitting him in the back by the Sacramento police officers who fired on him earlier this month.

When officers responding to reports of break-ins in the Meadowview neighborhood came upon Clark, he was standing in the yard of his grandmother’s house. Moments prior, the 22-year-old was spotted running and hopping fences to the spot where he was located. Without much warning, the cops fired more than 20 shots and waited more than two minutes before beginning to engage an unresponsive Clark from afar. Dr. Omalu estimates that the unarmed suspect died between 3 and 10 minutes after he was struck.

Clark was shot once under the armpit, once in the leg, twice in the neck, and four times in his lower back. The examiner found that he suffered a shattered vertebrae and a collapsed lung.

“These findings from the independent autopsy contradict the police narrative that we’ve been told,” family attorney Benjamin Crump said of the results. “This independent autopsy affirms that Stephon was not a threat to police and was slain in another senseless police killing under increasingly questionable circumstances.”

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March for Our Lives: Hundreds of thousands expected

Hundreds of thousands of people are expected to take to the streets Saturday for March for Our Lives events across the U.S. — the biggest set to happen in Washington, D.C.

Busload after busload has filled the nation’s capital with students from across the country, including some from as far away as California and Minnesota.

The march was announced by students days after the Valentine’s Day shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., and since then, more than 800 sister marches have been planned.

Events are scheduled in every U.S. state and on every continent, all with the same mission: ending gun violence and taking up gun-control legislation. Organizers expect 500,000 to descend on the nation’s capital, including many from Parkland.

Mei-Ling Ho-Shing arrived in D.C. on Thursday. She was one of the many who were inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during the attack, which left 17 dead. The junior said she plans to link arms with her classmates and march in hopes of changing laws so what happened at her school will never happen again.

“Douglas is in the house. We’re here and coming to make a change,” she said, adding “this isn’t a trending topic. This is people’s lives. We’re not going to stop after this. When we go home we’re still going to be fighting for this.”

The shooting instantly reignited the gun-control debate. But the students in Parkland — who spoke with a loud voice and amassed an enormous following in the hours and days after the shooting — seemed to disrupt the typical cycle after an attack and demanded an end to gun violence.

Within a month of the rampage, several companies cut ties with the National Rifle Association and stopped offering discounts, students from 3,000 schools held a nationwide walkout, and Florida’s governor signed a comprehensive bill that included tightening gun laws.

Jaclyn Corin, one of the core group of Parkland students leading the #NeverAgain movement and organizing the marches, said it’s been unbelievable to see the support around the nation and how thousands of students have rallied for the cause.

She said the outpouring is a “constant reminder that even though this shooting was a horrible tragedy, we’ll make these changes and see some light come out of the bad.”

Corin, 17, said preparations for the march have been stressful, but she and the others are excited. She said this march is just the beginning of what they hope to accomplish.

“We want to continue what we’re doing, especially leading up to November,” she said. “We want every young person to register to vote and head to the polls, no matter who they’re voting for or what party they’ve voting for.”

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