Tag Archives: black

Officer convicted in killing of 15-year-old Jordan Edwards — a rare outcome in police shootings

A former police officer in Texas has been found guilty of murder in the high-profile shooting death of 15-year-old Jordan Edwards — a rare victory for civil rights activists seeking justice for the dozens of unarmed African American men and boys who have been killed by police officers in recent years.

As Judge Brandon Birmingham read the verdict Tuesday against Roy Oliver, who worked in the Dallas suburb of Balch Springs, sobs came from the gallery of the packed courtroom. The last time an on-duty police officer in Dallas County was convicted of murder was in 1973. Oliver could be sentenced to life in prison.

“I’m just so thankful,” Jordan’s father, Odell Edwards, told reporters. “Thankful, thankful.”

Daryl Washington, an attorney representing the family, said the verdict meant more than justice for Jordan.

“It’s about Tamir Rice. It’s about Walter Scott. It’s about Alton Sterling,” he said, naming victims of police shootings in recent years. “It’s about every, every African American, unarmed African American, who has been killed and who has not gotten justice.”

Republican Gov. Greg Abbott tweeted a link to a news story about the conviction, saying that Jordan’s “life should never have been lost.”

On the night of April 29, 2017, Oliver fired an MC5 rifle into a Chevrolet Impala carrying Jordan and two of his brothers as it pulled away from a high school house party. Jordan, who was struck in the head, died later at a hospital.

Police initially said the vehicle had backed up toward Oliver “in an aggressive manner,” but body camera video showed the car was moving away from him and his partner. Days after the shooting, Oliver, who had served in the department for six years, was fired.

Jordan’s stepbrother, Vidal Allen, was driving the car the night of the shooting.

“I was very scared,” Allen testified. “I just wanted to get home and get everyone safe.”

Oliver, 38, has said he feared for his life and his partner’s safety.

“I had to make a decision. This car is about to hit my partner,” Oliver testified in the trial. “I had no other option.”

After a weeklong trial, it took the jury one day to reach a verdict.

Jordan’s death echoes other police shootings involving black boys and men. But no convictions were handed down in most of those cases.

In November 2014, Cleveland police got a 911 call about someone brandishing a pistol near a park — the weapon, the caller said, was “probably fake.” But in an incident captured on camera, a police cruiser pulled into the park and Officer Timothy Loehmann jumped out and opened fire. Within seconds, 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who had a toy gun, was dead.

Even before Tamir’s death, the U.S. Department of Justice had been investigating the Cleveland Police Department. A month after his shooting, it released a report saying Cleveland police displayed a pattern of using unnecessary force.

A year later, a grand jury decided not to indict Loehmann in Tamir’s death, saying he had reason to fear for his life.

In September 2016, in Columbus, Ohio, police shot and killed Tyre King, 13, who was carrying a BB gun while running from police. A grand jury declined to file criminal charges against the officer who killed him.

And in May 2017, an Oklahoma jury acquitted an officer who shot and killed Terence Crutcher, 40, as he stood with his hands above his head along a rural highway.

Those cases and others illustrate the difficulty of convicting police officers. The law in most places gives them the benefit of the doubt.

Prosecutors usually must show that an officer knowingly and intentionally killed without justification or provocation. A fear of harm has been successfully used as the justification for many shootings, even when the victim turned out to be unarmed.

The most recent case that ended in a conviction came last year when Michael Slager, a former officer in North Charleston, S.C., was first tried on murder charges in the April 2015 shooting of Walter Scott, an unarmed black man who was stopped for a driving with a broken taillight. But after those proceedings ended in a mistrial, Slager pleaded guilty to a civil rights violation and was sentenced to 20 years in prison.

The last Dallas County police officer convicted for murder while on duty was Darrell Cain, who shot and killed 12-year-old Santos Rodriguez after forcing him to endure a version of Russian roulette while handcuffed inside a patrol car.

There was no immediate reaction to Thursday’s verdict from local or national police groups.

John Fullinwider, a longtime Dallas activist and co-founder of Mothers Against Police Brutality, said Oliver’s conviction came as a surprise.

“I expected to see an angel fly over City Hall before I saw this murder conviction,” he said. “This is a victory, but we really need independent federal prosecutors in all fatal police shootings.”

Lee Merritt, a civil rights attorney who represents the Edwards family, said the conviction was justice for the country.

“We’ve seen time and time again, no charges, let alone convictions, in these high-profile shootings,” he said. “It is my hope that this is a turning point in the fight against police brutality against blacks.”

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Cop Fired For Pulling Over Daughter’s Black Boyfriend for No Reason

An Ohio police officer was fired after a video surfaced of him stopping and illegally detaining a young black man who was dating his daughter during a traffic stop.

Former officer John Kovach Jr. violated many conduct of policy procedures during a traffic stop that involved 18-year-old Makai Coleman. The footage from the stop has gone viral because of what Kovach said to Coleman. Kovach’s daughter was in the car as well. The officer told Coleman to get out of the vehicle and that he is “going to jail” after pulling him over with no cause.

When Coleman asked why he was being detained, the officer told him “Have a seat in my car, we’ll make s**t up as we go.” During this entire incident, Kovach ignored an emergency call about a road rage incident.

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Jordan Greenway is U.S. hockey team’s first African-American Olympian

GANGNEUNG, South Korea — Jordan Greenway doesn’t know when this historic moment will hit him.

He predicts it won’t happen while he’s helping Team USA try to win a gold medal in Pyeongchang. But sometime down the road it will have more of an impact.

Greenway, a junior winger for Boston University, is the first African-American to compete for the U.S. men’s hockey team in the Olympics.

“I think it’s great, it’s unbelievable,” Greenway said following a practice at Gangneung Ice Arena. “I don’t think it’s hit me how I think it will later on in my life to be honest with you. I grew up around a predominantly white population and a lot of white people playing (hockey), so I’ve always looked at it as just another kid. I think it’s an honor. I’m very excited about it. I hope I’m the first of many.”

Greenway, 20, has played hockey all his life. He put on his first pair of skates when he was 3. It’s what kids are accustomed to growing up in Canton, N.Y., which is 20 miles from the Canadian border. Plus his brother J.D., who is a sophomore defenseman at Wisconsin, and all of his cousins played. He was just next in the family line. Greenway tried out other sports — football, lacrosse, baseball — but didn’t develop the same passion.

“I was OK at them,” he said, laughing. “I kind of mixed it up, but I don’t know. I always had the most fun playing hockey. I enjoyed waking up really early in the morning and playing hockey. I didn’t have the same enjoyment going to (play other sports). I didn’t want to do that for football or other sports. Just thought this was the right fit for me.”

Greenway was drafted by the Minnesota Wild in 2015, but chose to stay in school. Because the NHL prohibited its players from Olympic competition, he’s able to live out his dream as an amateur.

Physically, he’s a big body on the ice at 6-5, 230 flat-footed. Greenway estimates he’s 6-8 or 6-9 on skates, but such an imposing figure could fudge his numbers and say he’s 7-feet and no one would blink.

His height certainly provides an advantage when getting to the net, protecting the puck and creating space, but it’s not always better to be bigger, he said.

“You get some of these smaller guys who are quick and they put you on edge,” he said, smiling. “But it definitely has a lot of benefits.”

Greenway tallied 25 points in 28 games for Boston U. this season and was second with eight points on the U.S. team that won gold in the 2017 junior world championships. He also played for the 2017 world championship team that finished fifth.

By making history, Greenway hopes to use these Olympics to inspire other African-American kids to play hockey.

“That’s definitely the goal,” he said. “Trying to get more, not just African American, but more cultures playing. I don’t think it’s any secret that more white people play than black people. So hopefully I can try to be another role model to try to put it in these kids’ minds to hopefully try and do something different and hopefully we’ll get more black people and different cultures playing the game.”

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Florida Cops Pull Over Black Female State Attorney For Garbage Reasons

Aramis Ayala, Florida‘s first Black female state attorney, was pulled over by a pair of police officers last month in Orlando. The now-viral body camera clip of the cops trying to shake down one of the most powerful women in the state for garbage reasons has been making the rounds with many calling a flag on the play.

Ayala, who resides in Orlando, was driving on June 19 when the two white officers pulled her over and surrounded both sides of her vehicle. In the exchange, Ayala is agreeable and doesn’t offer conflict, even when one of the officers ask why does she have a state attorney sign on her license.

The plot thickened when Ayala inquired what the stop was over, to which the officer fumbled that her windows were too dark although he’s heard admitting he had no accurate way of measuring it. Further, they said that running her tags pulled up no information on the vehicle, another likely story.

Many on social media reacted to clip, saying that this was a classic case of “Driving While Black” and we can imagine those two cops are jockeying a desk and making coffee rounds for the whole precinct after this incredible gaffe. Let’s not pretend that Ayala is a bit of a thorn in the side to Republican Gov. Rick Scott due to her refusal to seek the death penalty in trying criminal cases, which has those Blue Lives Matters dillweeds hot on her trail.

SOURCE: HHW

Will & Jada ARE NOT Getting a Divorce. See Their Response Inside

Update:

Under normal circumstances, I don’t usually respond to foolishness. (Because it’s contagious) But, so many people have extended me their “deepest condolences” that I figured – “What the hell… I can be foolish, too!”

So, in the interest of redundant, repetitious, over & over-again-ness… Jada and I are…

NOT GETTING A DIVORCE!!!!!!!!!!!!! : -)

I promise you all – if I ever decide to divorce my Queen – I SWEAR I’ll tell you myself!

‪#‎Dumb‬ People Should Have to Wear Scarlet D’s
-Will Smith

My king has spoken.

Will and Jada: Close To Divorce

It’s over! After 17 years, RadarOnline.com has exclusively learned that Will Smith and Jada Pinkett Smith are ending their rocky marriage – with a blockbuster secret divorce deal.

“For Will and Jada, holding it together these past few years has been tough because their marriage has been on life support for a long time,” an insider told Radar.

“They’re exhausted from trying to maintain the façade of a happy union,” the source continued. “They’ve decided to pull the plug in a carefully choreographed manner, [and] agree announcing their split at the end of the summer is the right move.”

The A-listers have already “worked out a confidential settlement to protect their $240 million fortune, and prepare their kids [son Jaden, 17, and daughter Willow, 14] for the fallout,” said the insider.

Hinting at their split earlier this year, the Bad Boys stud, 46, admitted that their marriage had “died” during an interview. Meanwhile, Pinkett Smith, 43, seemed to acknowledge Will’s notorious wandering eye, telling Howard Stern: “I’m not his watcher. He’s a grown man.”

She later added that she’s fine with Will’s ways, “as long as Will can look himself in the mirror and be okay.”

Rumors have persisted since 2013 that Smith romanced his Suicide Squad co-star Margot Robbie. He’s also been pictured without his wedding ring.

Pinkett Smith also allegedly cheated in 2011 with HawthoRNe co-star Marc Anthony.

“They tried to fix things with therapy, [but] it’s not happening,” explained the source.

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Kevin Hart Says His Biggest Fear Is Finding Out His Son Will Turn Out Gay

In a new interview with Rolling Stone Magazine comedian Kevin Hartexplains that his son’s sexuality is no laughing matter. Kevin admits that as a straight man, his number one job is to make sure his son doesn’t turn out to be homosexual…
“One of my biggest fears is my son growing up and being gay. That’s a fear. Keep in mind, I’m not homophobic. . . . Be happy. Do what you want to do. But me, as a heterosexual male, if I can prevent my son from being gay, I will.

“It’s about my fear. I’m thinking about what I did as a dad, did I do something wrong, and if I did, what was it? Not that I’m not gonna love my son or think about him any differently. The funny thing within that joke is it’s me getting mad at my son because of my own insecurities — I panicked. It has nothing to do with him, it’s about me. That’s the difference between bringing a joke across that’s well thought-out and saying something just to ruffle feathers.

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