Category Archives: crime

Master P Sues Cannabis Company for Bailing on Partnership

Master P is reportedly taking a California based cannabis company to court for bailing on their partnership, according to TMZ.

Master P got into the legal cannabis industry in November 2016 to launch his own branded strain, “Master P’s Trees” and brokered a deal with Privateer Holdings in March 2017. P was to promote the product and cover 50 percent of the production costs while Privateer cultivated the product and covered the other half. “Master P’s Trees” were set to launch in July, but according to court documents, the company backed out of the partnership at the last minute.

Master P is suing Privateer on the grounds of fraud and breach of contract claiming that they had no real intent to partner with him. Court docs state that Privateer only saw Master P as a way to get “an inside look into the urban and hip-hop demographic of cannabis users.”

For this, Master P is seeking $25 million in lost profits and damages.

SOURCE: VLADTV

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Teacher Suspended After Pulling Off Student’s Hijab

A teacher at the New Vision Academy Charter School in Nashville, Tennessee, was suspended Wednesday after two videos circulating on social media of someone removing a girl’s hijab was traced back to the educator.

In the first video, which is captioned “pretty hair,” the student wearing the hijab is shown hiding her face as someone removed the religious head scarf and exposed her hair to the classroom. Multiple students are seen playing with the girl’s hair as she tries to readjust the covering. Someone told her “her hair was too pretty to be covered.” A second video was posted with the caption, “lol all that hair covered up.”

A concerned viewer sent the videos to News 4. Both of the clips were reportedly posted on the teacher’s Snapchat account. When contacted by the media, the principal, Dr. Tim Malone began investigating immediately.

The teacher initially denied recording the video and said touching the hijab was not done out of disrespect. The girl’s mother and sister were very upset after they watched the video, saying, “This should never happen.”

In a statement to the news station Wednesday, Malone wrote that the teacher was suspended without pay:

“New Vision Academy is a diverse school. As a school community, we pride ourselves on embracing and celebrating our racial, ethnic, religious and economic diversity. Our students learn and grow, best when they learn from one another. To foster this environment, all students must feel respected and supported.

The actions depicted in the Snapchat video do not reflect the values, culture or climate of New Vision Academy. New Vision Academy will continue to emphasize that all staff members act in a way meant to empower and inspire our students. New Vision will use this video as an opportunity to press forward with increasing cultural sensitivity and awareness among all members of the New Vision community. The staff member in question has been suspended, without pay, and we have had direct discussions with the students depicted in the Snapchat. New Vision Academy apologizes for this unfortunate incident, and will be better in the future.”

SOURCE: VLADTV

Artists Awarded Damages in Graffiti Case

Brooklyn federal jurors ruled in the favor of 21 graffiti artists after a day of deliberations in the despite between land developers and the artists responsible for painting the historic Queens art Mecca known as 5 Pointz. The American mural space at 45-46 David Street in Long Island City was founded in 1993, and was a huge staple in the hip hop and art scene. It was recently closed down and whitewashed as developers have plans to build luxury rental space in the area.

Artists Awarded Damages in Graffiti Case

The collective of artists sued real estate developer Jerry Wolkoff under the Visual Artists Rights Act — a law passed in 1990 that protects artwork of “recognized stature.” The 49 pieces of graffiti that covered the location were legally protected when Wolkoff painted over them during the night without warning nearly 4 years ago. According to the counsel for the artists, each of the 21 were awarded damages.

In an interview with HipHopDX, Baum said “The jury sided strongly with the rights of the artists. This is a clear message from the people that the whitewash of the building by its owner Gerald Wolkoff was a cruel and willful act.”

This is the first trial that cites the Visuals Artists Rights Act, however, the jury’s decision was an advisory ruling, the final call is still a judge’s to make.

SOURCE: VLADTV

Richard Spencer Bounced a $10K Check for Florida Event

Alt-right White supremacist Richard Spencer’s controversial appearance at the University of Florida, Gainesville in October almost never happened, and the reason had nothing to do with students’ attempts to shut the event down. Rather, it appears that Spencer’s think tank organization bounced a check on the university only days before he was scheduled to show up.

On Wednesday, November 8, the UF released several hundred pages of emails that documented record of the failed transaction. A copy of the check reads, “We would like to confirm with you that the check (#1014) with the amount of $10,564.00 paid by the National Policy Institute on 10/10/2017 was returned due to “Insufficient Funds” in payer’s bank account on 10/12/2017.” Apparently, the check and rental contract for use of the university’s space was FedExed by NPI executive director Evan McLaren via same-day delivery on October 6. Six days later the school was alerted about the blunder.

The National Policy Institute has seen its share of unsuspected woes so far as finances go in 2017. Back in March, the organization learned that its non-profit tax-exempt status was being stripped by the IRS, for failure to file required tax returns since 2012. While the NPI’s current financial standing has gone unreported on, it is confirmed that they indeed eventually came through with their payment for Spencer’s University of Florida speech.

SOURCE: VLADTV

Tesla Slammed With Racial Discrimination Allegations

Three former black Tesla employees claim they experienced racial discrimination by company supervisors and fellow employees.

Tesla Slammed With New Round of Racial Discrimination Allegations

According to a lawsuit filed Tuesday, October 17, Owen Diaz and his son, Demetric (pictured above), along with Lamar Patterson, claim they faced racial remarks and racist graffiti drawings throughout their tenures in Tesla’s Fremont factory. According to NBC Bay Area, the former workers claim they were called the n-word multiple times, by both coworkers and their superiors. Owen Diaz claimed he found a “pickaninny” cartoon with the caption “Boo!” drawn on a piece of cardboard.

The suit claims that the Demetric Diaz was let go by the company after he complained about the treatment to a supervisor, who allegedly told the 19-year-old he was a replaceable temp worker. The suit states Owen Diaz continued working after his son’s dismissal but resigned after the harassment became worse.

Tesla Slammed With New Round of Racial Discrimination Allegations

While the trio maintains they filed multiple complaints with their staffing agency and supervisors of the company, in a statement by Tesla, the company claims the only complaint presented by any of the workers was one issue of a “belligerent coworker.” However, this is not the first time Tesla has dealt with racial discrimination claims. Back in September, video released to the public showed former Tesla employee DeWitt Lambert being blasted with offensive remarks by a co-worker.

SOURCE: VLADTV

Kaepernick Files Collusion Grievance Against Owners of the NFL

Colin Kaepernick is taking the NFL to court. It was reported on Sunday, October 15, that the star quarterback-turned-activist has filed a grievance that accuses the league’s team owners of collusion under its collective bargaining agreement with the NFL Players Association. After news broke about the move it was confirmed that he has foregone representation under the Players Association and hired high powered attorney Mark Geragos (who has defended the likes of Michael Jackson and Chris Brown) to argue his case.

Each of the NFL’s 32 teams has been sent a copy of the court document, as has the NFLPA. The complaint charges that owners and executives around the NFL “have colluded to deprive Mr. Kaepernick of employment rights in retaliation for Mr. Kaepernick’s leadership and advocacy for equality and social justice and his bringing awareness to peculiar institutions still undermining racial equality in the United States.” Geragos has called for an arbitration hearing on behalf of his client.

Kaepernick has been out of a job since opting out of his contract with the San Francisco 49ers in March. He’d go on to shop his on-field abilities to a couple of teams but stopped receiving calls to work out for teams in the market for a quarterback before long. As the offseason dragged out with various questionable signings at the quarterback position, fans began to question why Kaepernick was being passed over and suspicions that he was being blackballed began to take root. While a number of players and analysts have openly professed their belief that his activism is viewed as a “distraction” and thus played a role in him being denied a shot, team representatives have vehemently denied that he is being blackballed on their account.

SOURCE: VLADTV

Utah officer fired after nurse’s arrest caught on video

A Utah police officer was fired Tuesday after being seen on video roughly handcuffing a nurse because she refused to allow a blood draw in an incident that became a flashpoint in the national conversation about use of force.

Salt Lake City Police Chief Mike Brown made the decision to fire Detective Jeff Payne after an internal investigation found he violated department policies when he arrested nurse Alex Wubbels and dragged her screaming from the hospital, department spokesman Sgt. Brandon Shearer said.

Brown said in a disciplinary letter that he was “deeply troubled” by Payne’s conduct, which he described as “inappropriate, unreasonable, unwarranted, discourteous, disrespectful” and said brought “significant disrepute” on the department.

“You demonstrated extremely poor professional judgment (especially for an officer with 27 years of experience), which calls into question your ability to effectively serve the public and the department,” Brown wrote.

Attorney Greg Skordas, who represents Payne, said his client plans to appeal a firing he considers unfair and over the top. Skordas said Payne would still be employed if the body camera footage hadn’t generated so much attention and blown the events out of proportion.

Payne’s supervisor, Lt. James Tracy, was demoted to officer. His lawyer, Ed Brass, couldn’t immediately be reached.

Tracy made an impulsive decision in ordering Payne to arrest Wubbels without first taking time to understand the facts of the situation and the law, Brown wrote in his disciplinary letter.

He said the order created chaos and unnecessarily escalated the situation.

“Your lack of judgment and leadership in this matter is unacceptable, and as a result, I no longer believe that you can retain a leadership position in the department,” Brown said.

The letter said Wubbels told investigators that Tracy minimized her concerns, intimidated and lectured her, and made her feel like she was to blame for the events.

The Associated Press obtained the disciplinary letters for Payne and Tracy through a public records request.

Wubbels’ attorney, Karra Porter, said they are pleased that Brown took action and recognized that the officers made crucial mistakes that have eroded public trust. Porter said she hopes the events are a catalyst to more public conversations about appropriate police behavior.

The case shows the vital importance of officers wearing body cameras and making those videos available to the public, Porter said.

“Without the body camera footage, it would have been a she-said, they-said,” Porter said. “Alex feels very strongly that her story would have never been told if it weren’t for the body camera footage.”

Asked about a potential lawsuit, Porter said she expects to meet soon with city officials to discuss next steps that could include settlement talks.

The officers have five business days to appeal the decisions by the chief.

The case received widespread attention after police body-camera video was released by Wubbels and her lawyer in late August.

The video showed her explaining that hospital policy required a warrant or formal consent to draw blood from the patient who had been injured in a car crash.

The patient wasn’t suspected of wrongdoing. He was an off-duty reserve Idaho police officer driving a semitrailer when he was hit by a man fleeing police in a pickup truck.

Payne nevertheless insisted on the blood draw, saying the evidence would protect the man.

Payne told Wubbels his supervisor said he should arrest her if she didn’t allow the draw. Wubbels was later freed from the handcuffs and has not been charged.

Both officers were investigated and placed on paid administrative leave after the video became public. Salt Lake City police apologized and changed their policies.

Prosecutors, meanwhile, opened a criminal investigation into the arrest and asked the FBI to determine if there were any civil rights violations.

Payne was also fired from a part-time job as a paramedic after he was caught on camera saying he’d take transient patients to the University of Utah hospital where Wubbels worked and transport “good patients” elsewhere.

Payne had previously been disciplined in 2013 after internal-affairs investigators confirmed that he sexually harassed a female co-worker in a “persistent and severe” way.

His tenure also brought commendations for solving burglary cases and being shot in the shoulder during a traffic stop in 1998.

Tracy, meanwhile, earned commendations for drug and burglary investigations.