Tag Archives: history

Jermaine Dupri Kicks Off So So Def Exhibit at the Grammy Museum

In 1993, producer Jermaine Dupri launched his So So Def record label to showcase southern hip-hop artists. In the quarter-century since then, the imprint has worked with a slew of big-name artists from the ’90s and 2000s, including Jagged Edge, Daz Dillinger, Da Brat, Bow Wow, Kriss Kross, and Anthony Hamilton.

Jermaine Dupri Kicks Off So So Def Exhibit at the Grammy Museum

In celebration of the record label’s achievements and cultural influence, the Grammy Museum has launched a four-month exhibit dedicated entirely to So So Def. Billboard reports this is the first time a hip-hop label has received its own show at the Los Angeles facility. The show will feature stage outfits, photos, and other memorabilia from the label’s stars.

“Considering this year marks the 45th anniversary of hip-hop, it is remarkable that So So Def is celebrating 25 years of extraordinary success in the industry,” Grammy Museum curator Nwaka Onwusa said in a statement. “It is impossible to showcase everything that Jermaine Dupri has done to elevate Atlanta hip-hop and the far-reaching influence of So So Def throughout the world. The Grammy Museum is very excited to present this look into the label’s enduring legacy.”

Jermaine Dupri Kicks Off So So Def Exhibit at the Grammy Museum

The exhibit kicked off Wednesday night with an appearance by Dupri and a number of his So So Def associates. The producer spoke about the label’s milestones, its role in the Atlanta culture, as well as his induction into the Songwriters Hall of Fame.

“My first visit to the Grammy Museum was around the time it opened and they created the ‘Make a Record with Jermaine Dupri’ experience,” Dupri said. “It’s such an honor to return for this meaningful tribute to So So Def, Jermaine Dupri and the city of Atlanta.”

The exhibit, called Jermaine Dupri & So So Def: 25 Years of Elevating Culture, will run through January. You can learn more about the show, including how to cop tickets, at the Grammy website.

The So So Def family will also hit the road next month for the 25th anniversary Cultural Curren$y Tour. The trek will kick off Oct. 14 in Washington, D.C., and include performances by Xscape, Hamilton, Da Brat, and Jagged Edge.

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T.I. Curating Pop-up Museum in Atlanta

Trap music will be getting some props thanks to plans by rapper T.I. to curate a museum in Atlanta, Vibe is reporting.

T.I. Curating Pop-up Museum in Atlanta

The pop-up museum is launching 15 years from the release of the artist’s Trap Muzik, which he said he created to draw attention to all the frustrations a Black man in America might have to juggle – from co-parenting to drug addiction, and from society’s negative view to struggling relationships. Atlantic Records produced Trap Muzik in 2003.

T.I. is launching the museum in partnership with hip-hop journalist Maurice Garland, creative artist DL Warfield and others, Vibe reports. Future, 21 Savage, 2 Chainz, Gucci Mane, Rick Ross, and Young Jeezy are some of the artists who will be featured because they helped elevate the public presence of the trap, according to Vibe.

The pop-up museum has a website and Instagram account set up. Both instruct people to “stay tuned.”

T.I. Curating Pop-up Museum in Atlanta

When he released Trap Muzik, T.I. said he wanted to create something that would be a classic.

“I knew I had to make timeless music,” Noisey quoted him as saying. “It was about showing that even if you were participating in felonious activities, there were still other things you needed to deal with: you’re not just drug dealing but also dealing with a relationship with your parents, your girlfriend, having a child too young and being looked down on by society as one thing when you’re actually more than that definition.”

He told Noisey, “You might have a homeboy who just died, but he wasn’t even in the streets like that. Trap Muzik was kind of crystallizing this Black experience into a piece of music.”

The pop-up museum will be located in West Atlanta and will open to the public on Sept. 30. Trap music evolved out of Southern hip-hop and is considered a sub-genre.

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Beyonce Brings Out JAY-Z and Destiny’s Child for Historic Coachella Headlining Set

After postponing 2017’s headlining Coachella slot due to her pregnancy with twins, Beyoncé made a historic return to the main stage to close out the second night (April 14) of the festival in Indio, Calif.

Prior to what would ultimately turn out to be a new career-defining peak, rumors swirled that the pop megastar would reunite Destiny’s Child and bring out 100 dancers to back her up. And just hours before performance began, she took to Facebook to shout out her fans, and let them know to get in formation during the hour intermission before the games began.

“I am so excited to see the BeyHive tonight at Coachella,” she wrote. “We have been working hard and have a special show planned for you so please be safe and stay hydrated. We need your energy! There will be an hour intermission before my performance, so mark your spot, charge your phones, grab your drinks. Can’t wait to see y’all at 11:05pm!”

The speculation and rumors were accurate: Not only did Beyoncé reach a new creative peak, but she did it all while making it look effortless. Throughout a ceaseless two-hour set, the pop icon took the swelling Coachella crowd back to the days of feverish high school pep rallies and college homecomings. On stage, a tiered set of bleachers scraped the sky as a brass band and dozens of dancers backed what was indisputably the weekend’s most stunning performance, with guest appearances from a reunited Destiny’s Child (for a series of their classics), as well as cameos from her husband JAY-Z and sister Solange.

Most importantly, though, Beyoncé made history, not just in her own career — turning her music and performance into high art — but at the festival, which is now in its 19th year. “Coachella, thanks for allowing me to be the first black woman to headline,” she said before bringing out Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams. “Ain’t that ’bout a bitch?”

Even by Beyoncé’s standards, the show went above and beyond. It was impeccably choreographed, designed and directed, right down to the minute details — Bey tapping her fingers across her knees in time to the beat on “Partition,” the exact dance moves done for her rendition of “Baby Boy,” the little teases of hits from the past as songs segued from one to the next.

“This is a very important performance for me,” she told the crowd between “Sorry” and “Bow Down/I Been On.” “I’m happy to be back home on the stage tonight.”

But above all, Beyoncé did it without breaking a sweat, an almost superhuman feat. Whether she was soaring over the crowd during “Drunk in Love,” or hitting micro-choreographed dance moves with the best backup dancers available while growling, “Suck on my balls” during “Sorry,” she proved that she’s truly pushing her art form forward, in both creative scope and the breadth of music she’s recorded. It was invaluable context, even, to get glimpses of her roots throughout the performance, whether Bey was singing with JAY-Z for “Déjà Vu,” dancing with Solange for the extended version of “Get Me Bodied,” or traipsing through her Destiny’s Child days with Rowland and Williams as if the chemistry had never wavered.

Of course, when it comes to Beyoncé, nothing ever wavers. Not only did the Queen set a new standard for herself at Coachella, but she set a standard for the entire festival and its future marquee performers — not just as the first black woman to headline the fest, but as an artist whose creative prowess will continue to be nearly impossible to match.

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Honoring Martin Luther King, Jr. 50 years after assassination

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – The King family will join thousands in Memphis this week to mark the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Dr. King’s daughter Bernice King arrived in Memphis Monday afternoon. She was aboard a Delta charter flight. So was FOX 5’s Deidra Dukes, who was the only reporter on board and got to interviewed Rev. Bernice King during the flight.

King talked a lot about what this week will mean not only for her but other members of her family as she returns Memphis. The first time she journeyed to Memphis was in her 30s because the idea of making this trip in the past has been so painful for her. So, this week will likely stir many emotions.

“It’s emotional for me but I’m trying not to let it overwhelm me so I can function,” Dr. Bernice King said.

A wave of emotion came over Dr. Bernice King as she made her way through TSA at Hartsfield Jackson for the trip to Memphis.

“I think I said, you know, I didn’t get an opportunity to go fifty years ago, then I broke down crying. I didn’t know it was coming,” Dr. Bernice King said.

Fifty years ago, a then five-year-old Bernice was left behind as her mother and three older siblings who traveled to Memphis just days after Dr. Martin Luther King Jr was assassinated.

“On April 8, 1968, my mom came to Memphis to lead the march my father would have led which was the day before the funeral and she brought the three older children and I got left in Atlanta,” Dr. Bernice King said.

Monday afternoon, she boarded a Delta charter flight joined by dozens of religious and civil rights leaders, for the pilgrimage to Memphis. King said the number of pastors joining her on this journey really hold special significance.

“Tell them that 50 years ago because my father spoke out against the war in Vietnam he became even more controversial and a lot of churches began to close their doors even black churches. It was hard for him to have mass meetings in churches and very few were welcoming. So, for me to come back here with a group of pastors is unbelievable for me,” Bernice King told FOX 5’s Deidra Dukes.

King toured the Lorraine Motel where her father was shot and killed that fateful day in April of 1968 as he stood on the hotel balcony.

“It’s interesting to be able to have these experiences, connections not knowing my father, but kind of sensing the presence of his spirit,” Bernice King said. “I do feel a connection to his spirit and what he was trying to do.”

Bernice King will be joined by her brother Martin for this week’s commemorative events in Memphis. On Tuesday, they will speak at the Mason Temple, where their father delivered his last speech.

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Alicia Keys Attend Women’s March

Protests against Donald Trump’s presidency have become a global movement. Washington D.C., Chicago, Los Angeles, New York City, London, Toronto, and Paris, are just some of the cities hosting marches Saturday (Jan. 21).

Alicia Keys Attend Women’s March

Though the final numbers have yet to be tallied, it’s already clear that the Women’s March trumped the inauguration figures. Alicia Keys, Janelle Monae, America Ferrera, and Uzo Aduba, were among those at the Washington D.C. march.

Alicia Keys Attend Women’s March
“We are mothers, we are caregivers, we are artists, we are activists,” Keys told the crowd. “We are entrepreneurs, doctors, leaders of industry and technology. Our potential is unlimited. We rise!” Keys also performed “Girl on Fire,” while Monae shared the stage with the Mothers of the Movement, and performed “Hell You Talmbout” off her 2013 album, The Electric Lady.

Alicia Keys Attend Women’s March

Ferrerra also shared a powerful address with the crowd. “It’s been a heart-wrenching time to be a woman and an immigrant in this country,” said the 32-year-old actress. “Our dignity, our character, our rights have all been under attack and a platform of hate and division assumed power yesterday. But the president is not America. His cabinet is not America. Congress is not America, we are America and we are here to stay.” – See more at:

SOURCE: WWF

Inside the Women’s March & History in the Making

Donald Trump hammered home in his inaugural address outside the Capitol building Friday the promise he had sewn onto so many red ballcaps: that he would Make America Great Again. In the same spot the following day, protesters with far less nostalgia for America’s past – women who lived through the Civil Rights movement, who came of age in an era when abortion was criminalized, who have vivid memories of a time when gay men and women were regularly victimized – have gathered to say, We are not going back. 

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An estimated 500,000 marchers – more than double the crowd that showed up to watch Trump’s swearing-in – are squeezed onto the National Mall with their families and their hand-drawn signs and their pink knit caps, waiting for their turn to talk at the Women’s March on Washington.

They self-describe as “nasty,” but for the most part the marchers are good: they don’t push, they carry their possessions in translucent bags, as requested, and their posters don’t have poles or sticks or stakes. Some are frustrated to see the evangelical Christians who are parked in the middle of the Mall hoisting signs that read “Attention Rebellious Jezebels” and “Abortion Is Murder” with strictly verboten metal poles.

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It isn’t fair, but add it to the fucking list: Hillary Clinton earned three million more votes than Donald Trump and still lost the presidency. Women earn 80 cents on the dollar compared to men – women of color even less. They have only 19 percent representation in Congress.

As they’ve proven by turning out in record numbers all over the U.S. and the world Saturday, women are tired of double standards. So they surround the anti-abortion protesters and chant, “My body, my choice!” and “Love trumps hate!” loud enough to drown out the bullhorn.

A teenage boy leans out from the Newseum’s second-floor balcony, waving and kissing his star-spangled Make America Great Again hat and hollering, “Jesus loves you! Donald Trump loves you!” as the march sweeps down Pennsylvania Avenue. The marchers channel Michelle Obama, drowning him out with chants of, “When they go low, we go high!”

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For the millions of men and women pouring into the streets around the world Saturday, the march is a show of force, proof that for however many people are happy about Donald Trump’s inauguration – and that number is far smaller than he or his press secretary would have us believe – many more are unhappy. Across the country, and in countries around the globe, people are showing up to drown Trump out.

Just past the Newseum, four women – ages 57, 66, 77 and 79 – are sitting on a bench, watching as a line of police vans cuts through the protesters. One of the women, Roberta Safer, explains why they drove together from Maryland for the march. “I demonstrated in 1957 for Civil Rights,” she says. “It’s still the same problems, and Donald Trump’s cabinet picks are going to reverse many of the things that we’ve had. … It just upsets me to see us go backwards.”

Her friend Rosanna Mason has similar concerns. “My wife, before she died, was a teacher. I’m getting texts constantly from her students: ‘What about me, what about me? Am I going to be deported? Are they going to send me to [conversion] therapy?’ A lot of people are scared.” She says she tells them the only thing she can: that she remembers how she coped as a lesbian before gay rights were mainstream. “I remember back in the Seventies, I remember the Eighties, the violence. I tell them to hold on to your friends. … because when we all do it together, we’ll be stronger.”

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The Bikers for Trump have set up a counter-protest in support of the new president at a park on Pennsylvania Avenue. There aren’t more than 20 Trump supporters there, but they have a stage equipped with speakers blasting Lee Greenwood, Toby Keith and Kid Rock at an unreasonable volume. At one point, the group’s head, Chris Cox, gets onstage and tells the marchers, “On November 8th, America voted, and it voted for Donald Trump.”

“Three million votes! Three million votes!” they chant back.

Off to one side, 31-year-old Courtney Miller is holding a sign that reads, “Sorry. Were my civil rights getting the way of your privilege?” She asks a man in a Confederate hat why he still wears it even though the South lost. He retorts by asking her why she has black pride – her people lost too, he says. For ten minutes, he tries (and fails) to defend an indefensible point, while she maintains her composure, trying, maybe in vain, to reason with him.

“You never get anything accomplished by fighting, by yelling and screaming. We’re not going to get our points across. We might leave here today and agree to disagree, but maybe I said something that will make him think,” Miller says after the interaction. “I’m standing here because my grandparents had to do this. Now I have to do this. I’m hoping my kids don’t have to do this. We’re marching for the same things, and I’m getting tired.”

SOURCE: RS